Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Tocguigny

Yvonne Tocguigny

Chief Creative and Strategy Officer, Archer Malmo

In 1980, Yvonne Tocquigny launched her company, Tocquigny (TOH-KEY-KNEE), and from its inception, the digitally minded creative shop has focused on transforming brands. Adweek, B2B and Clutch have all named Tocquigny a top agency, honors reflective of the shop's work for clients such as CITGO, Jeep, Dell, Hitachi, USAA and Caterpillar. Collecting and building a talented team of makers, thinkers and doers — all working within a company culture that complements the uniqueness of Austin — Ms. Tocquigny is regarded as a forward-thinker in the industry, one who looks beyond the norm to reach goals and objectives. Ms. Tocquigny has become a business trailblazer, a leading marketer, a sought-after speaker, a respected writer and a mentor to many. In 2015, Archer Malmo, a leading brand communications agency based in Memphis, approached Ms. Tocquigny to consider an acquisition. Learning that Archer Malmo shared many of Tocquigny's philosophies and values, and understanding that the combination of the two shops would better serve the agency's clients, Ms. Tocquigny made the bold move to join forces. Despite the change of the company name, the agency's work for clients in Austin and throughout the country remains the same, as have Ms. Tocquigny's responsibilities. She continues to advise companies on topics such as digital marketing strategies, branding, messaging, business planning and ways to structure marketing organizations. Yvonne and her senior staff continue to be responsible for generating business for the Austin office. As Creative and Strategy Officer of Archer Malmo, Austin, Ms. Tocquigny remains a popular columnist for the Austin Business Journal and is a frequent speaker for groups of CEOs across the country, international Six Sigma organizations, CEOs in the banking and finance industry and groups of startup entrepreneurs. Recently, Yvonne presented at BMA15, the largest B2B marketing conference in the world. Ms. Tocquigny is a Founding Partner and mentor for The Capital Factory, an incubator for startup companies that draws business talent from across the country. She is an inaugural member of the Advisory Council for the School of Undergraduate Studies at the University of Texas and a member of the Advisory Board of the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas.

Please visit http://archermalmo.com/ for more information.

Ms. Tocguigny can be contacted at 512-532-2800 or Yvonnet@archermalmo.com

Coming up in December 2019...

Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

According to a recent study, the hospitality industry accounted for 2.9 trillion dollars in sales and in the U.S. alone, was responsible for 1 in 9 jobs. In an industry of that scope and dimension, legal issues touch every aspect of a hotel's operation, and legal services are required in order to conform to all prevailing laws and regulations. Though not all hotels face the same issues, there are some industry-wide subjects that are of concern more broadly. One of those matters is the issue of immigration and how it affects the ability of hotels to recruit qualified employees. The hotel industry is currently facing a labor crisis; the U.S. Labor Department estimates that there are 600,000 unfilled jobs in the industry. Part of the problem contributing to this labor shortage is the lack of H2B visas for low-skilled workers, combined with the difficulty in obtaining J-1 visas for temporary workers. Because comprehensive immigration reform is not being addressed politically, hotel managers expect things are going to get worse before they get better. Corporate cyber security is another major legal issue the industry must address. Hotels are under enormous pressure in this area given the large volume of customer financial transactions they handle daily. Recently, a federal court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission had the power to regulate corporate cyber security, so it is incumbent on hotels to establish data security programs in order to prevent data breaches. The lack of such programs could cause hotels to face legal threats from government agencies, class action lawsuits, and damage to their brand image if a data breach should occur. These are just two of the critical issues that the December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.