Editorial Board   

Mr. Meek

Frank Meek

International Technical & Training Director, Orkin, LLC

“Knowledge is power when it comes to effective pest management.” An industry veteran, Frank Meek has been with Orkin since 1986. In 2003, he was named among the future leaders of the pest management industry in Pest Control Technology magazine's “40 Under 40” ranking. Currently, as the International Technical and Training Director, Mr. Meek provides technical support and training in both sales and service to Orkin's international franchises, helping them grow and develop in their specific markets. As a board-certified entomologist, Mr. Meek teaches Integrated Pest Management principles and can explain how to use all available methodologies to prevent pest infestations in various commercial settings. Mr. Meek has experience in all areas of pest control, enabling him to provide a cross-industry overview of the role that pest management can play in improved safety and sanitation. His common-sense approach and extensive experience make him a natural media resource. Among other pest management topics, he is well versed in best pest management practices in hospitality environments. Mr. Meek is a regular speaker at National Pest Management Association (NPMA) and many international, state and regional pest control association meetings, as well as non pest control industry associations such as the American Society for Healthcare Environmental Services (ASHES). He has published many articles for the pest control industry trade magazines, as well as major media outlets such as Wall Street Journal, New York Times, CNN, MSNBC and others. Meek has also represented Orkin on national television with appearances on shows such as the NBC Today Show, CNN and ABC News. Mr. Meek writes a monthly column called “Technicalities” for PMP magazine. In 2005, he co-authored the IPM Recommended Practice book for American Society for Healthcare Environmental Services (ASHES), which has become the standard for providing pest management service to the healthcare industry. In 2010, Mr. Meek authored the chapter on Occasional Invader Pest in the 10th edition of the Mallis Handbook to Pest Control Operations. Previously, Mr. Meek has contributed to HotelExecutive.com on topics ranging from pest management practices for LEED certification to bed bugs and integrating pest management into redesign plans.

Mr. Meek can be contacted at 404-888-2898 or fmeek@rollinscorp.com

Coming up in May 2020...

Eco-Friendly Practices: Creative Innovation

Being eco-friendly is no longer a fad. It is an urgent planetary need and hotels are actively doing their part to reduce their carbon footprint by implementing sustainable, green practices. In addition to the goodwill derived from doing the right thing, hotels are also realizing the benefits to their business. A large percentage of Millennials expect hotels to be eco-friendly and will only patronize those properties that are proudly conforming. Consequently, more hotels are realizing that sustainability is a key element in a successful branding strategy. In addition, going green can lead to a more profitable bottom line, as savings on electricity, water and cleaning materials can add up. Also, there are other advantages that come with being an eco-friendly business, such as government subsidies and tax and loan incentives. As a result, many hotels are finding innovative ways to integrate eco-friendly practices into their business. Geo-thermal energy systems, along with energy-from-waste systems, are being used to heat and cool the property. Passive solar panels, green roofs, natural lighting and natural ventilation strategies also assist in energy conservation. Low-flow water systems and plumbing fixtures make a contribution, as does eco-friendly hardwood flooring, and energy efficient televisions and appliances throughout the property. In addition, some hotels have implemented in-room recycling programs, and only provide all-natural, personal care items. One hotel has actually constructed a bee-keeping operation on their grounds. Not only is this good for the bees but the hotel also produces products from the operation which they sell. This kind of creative innovation also holds enormous appeal to guests. The May issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some hotels are doing to integrate sustainable practices into their operations and how they are benefiting from them.