Mr. Wilson

Jonathan Wilson

VP Product Innovation & Brand Services

Hilton Worldwide

Jonathan Wilson leads a team of the best professionals in the industry to provide global product innovation and brand definition in food and beverage, spa and wellness, rooms division, and meeting and public spaces for 14 worldwide brands. In addition, he is responsible for pursuing the development of strategic opportunities in innovation through creative partner solutions, talent exposure and a fostered environment.

Prior to Joining Hilton Worldwide in May of 2015, Mr. Wilson spent 15 years at Princess Cruises, the number one cruise line in the premium market segment and fourth largest cruise line in the world. As vice president, guest food and beverage experience, product development and hotel analysis, Mr. Wilson led the team that creates and delivers the food, beverage, bar, lounge, and dining experiences for guests and crew through guest culinary, dining and beverage services. He was responsible for guiding product development in the areas of culinary, dining and beverage services, through newbuild initiatives, revitalization efforts, capital expenditure, crew engagement and product relevance of Asia source markets. The goal of his team was to create onboard offerings that drive new demand and build customer loyalty while maximizing onboard revenue, cost control, operational efficiencies.

Mr. Wilson's positions within Princess Cruises included director of culinary operations, director of hotel operations, vice president of hotel operations for newbuild and product development, and vice president of hotel operations food & beverage and product development.

Before joining Princess Cruises, Mr. Wilson held management positions at the Institute of Hotel and Tourism Management where he led the Educational Division of the Belvoir Park Swiss Hotel School as well as functional hotel and food and beverage operations; The Palace of the Lost City in South Africa, and the Grand Wailea Resort and Spa in Maui, Hawaii where his career as a Chef de Cuisine afforded him the opportunity to cook for celebrities, dignitaries and peers.

Starting as a chef by trade with an apprenticeship from the Grove Park Inn and Country Club in North Carolina, Mr. Wilson also earned a degree in Culinary Arts from Johnson and Wales University.

Originally from Indiana, Mr. Wilson continues to enjoy traveling the world and now lives with his wife and three daughters in Leesburg, VA.

Please visit http://www.hilton.com for more information.

Mr. Wilson can be contacted at 703-883-1000 or jonathan.wilson@hilton.com

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, its that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.