Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Steinke

Gaye Steinke

General Manager, Allegria Spa at Park Hyatt Beaver Creek

Gaye Steinke is the General Manager of Allegria Spa at the Park Hyatt Beaver Creek. She also serves on the Leadership Committee of the Park Hyatt. Located in the heart of Beaver Creek, at the base of one of Colorado’s most celebrated mountain resorts, Park Hyatt Beaver Creek Resort and Spa provides guests unprecedented access to some of the best outdoor experiences all year round. Allegria Spa is an indulgent escape that provides soothing spa and body treatments – from massages to organic scrubs – that utilize the healing elements of Beaver Creek mountain to rejuvenate and replenish. Ms. Steinke is also involved in the concept, planning and development of spas and fitness centers for East West Partners including Allegria Spa (opened 1998), Spa Anjali at the Westin Riverfront (opened 2007), the Spa at the Ritz Carlton Lake Tahoe (opened 2009), Moonlight Spa, Big Sky MT(opened 2002) . Prior to that she was General Manager of Aria Spa and Club in Vail, CO. She has traveled throughout the Americas, Africa, Europe and Asia staying current on spa trends and best practices. Dedicated to sustainable efforts, Ms. Steinke was on the Board of the Green Spa Network 2013-2015 and has been a presenting speaker at the Green Spa Congress in 2011, 2012 and 2013. Please visit http://www.hyatt.com for more information.

Ms. Steinke can be contacted at 970-949-1234 or gaye.steinke@hyatt.com

Coming up in April 2018...

Guest Service: Empowering People

Excellent customer service is vitally important in all businesses but it is especially important for hotels where customer service is the lifeblood of the business. Outstanding customer service is essential in creating new customers, retaining existing customers, and cultivating referrals for future customers. Employees who meet and exceed guest expectations are critical to a hotel's success, and it begins with the hiring process. It is imperative for HR personnel to screen for and hire people who inherently possess customer-friendly traits - empathy, warmth and conscientiousness - which allow them to serve guests naturally and authentically. Trait-based hiring means considering more than just a candidate's technical skills and background; it means looking for and selecting employees who naturally desire to take care of people, who derive satisfaction and pleasure from fulfilling guests' needs, and who don't consider customer service to be a chore. Without the presence of these specific traits and attributes, it is difficult for an employee to provide genuine hospitality. Once that kind of employee has been hired, it is necessary to empower them. Some forward-thinking hotels empower their employees to proactively fix customer problems without having to wait for management approval. This employee empowerment—the permission to be creative, and even having the authority to spend money on a customer's behalf - is a resourceful way to resolve guest problems quickly and efficiently. When management places their faith in an employee's good judgment, it inspires a sense of trust and provides a sense of higher purpose beyond a simple paycheck. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.