Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Bravo-Smith

Manuela Bravo-Smith

Senior Designer - Hospitality, Carrier Johnson + Culture

From a very young age, as early as five or six-years-old, Manuela Bravo-Smith knew she wanted to become an architect. Born in Mexico City and raised in Guadalajara, Mexico, Ms. Bravo-Smith has experienced the tangible and visual contrast between communities through time. Through travel and contact with various cultures, she has had the opportunity to reflect on how others see and experience new places. She has been influenced by her parentís background: her motherís simple and calm farm lifestyle, and her fatherís demanding career as a civil engineer in what was the biggest city in the world at the time. After completing a five-year architectural degree program from the Guadalajara Universityís CUAAD (University Center of Art, Architecture and Design) in 1997, Ms. Bravo-Smith began her professional journey from working at job sites to a project management position at an international engineering company, and finally to her current position with Carrier Johnson + CULTURE. The journey also led her to leave her native Mexico for Monterey in 2002, and then to San Diego in 2004. Working with well-established and respected architectural firms, Ms. Bravo-Smith has been exposed to a variety of domestic and international projects, ranging in building type from hospitality and mixed-use residential to corporate. While maintaining her architectural background she segued into the interior design field, and has been focused primarily on the hospitality sector since 2009. Working on four- and five-star hotel projects, Ms. Bravo-Smith works to elicit a unique personality for each project, rooting the design of each in the regional environment and historical context. Please visit http://www.carrierjohnson.com for more information.

Ms. Bravo-Smith can be contacted at 619-239-2353 or web@carrierjohnson.com

Coming up in March 2018...

Human Resources: Value Creation

Businesses must evolve to stay competitive and this is also true of employment positions within those organizations. In the hotel industry, for example, the role that HR professionals perform continues to broaden and expand. Today, they are generally responsible for five key areas - government compliance; payroll and benefits; employee acquisition and retention; training and development; and organizational structure and culture. In this enlarged capacity, HR professionals are no longer seen as part of an administrative cost center, but rather as a member of the leadership team that creates strategic value within their organization. HR professionals help to define company policies and plans; enact and enforce systems of accountability; and utilize definable metrics to measure and justify outcomes. Of course, there are always new issues for HR professionals to address. Though seemingly safe for the moment, will the Affordable Care Act ultimately be repealed and replaced and, if so, what will the ramifications be? There are issues pertaining to Millennials in the workforce and women in leadership roles, as well as determining the appropriate use of social media within the organization. There are new onboarding processes and e-learning training platforms to evaluate, in addition to keeping abreast of political issues like the minimum wage hike movement, or the re-evaluation of overtime rules. Finally, there are genuine immigration and deportation issues that affect HR professionals, especially if they are located in Dreamer Cities, or employ a workforce that could be adversely impacted by federal government policies. The March Hotel Business Review will take a look at some of the issues, strategies and techniques that HR professionals are employing to create and sustain value in their organization.