Editorial Board   

Ms. Samsel

Christine Samsel

Attorney, Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck

Christine Samsel is a highly respected labor and employment attorney with Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck.

Ms. Samsel advises employers on virtually every aspect of employment law, from advice and counseling, training and contract negotiation to litigation. She conducts due diligence for companies and investors with respect to labor and employment issues in corporate transactions and financial restructuring.

Ms. Samsel regularly negotiates and drafts high-level executive employment agreements and ancillary documents.? She assists companies in establishing employment policies, conducting employee / management training, negotiating severance agreements, conducting internal investigations and audits, and implementing reductions in force.

Throughout her extensive career, Ms. Samsel has handled a wide variety of federal, state and local administrative proceedings before agencies such as the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the U.S. Department of Labor, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, the U.S. Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs and comparable state and local agencies, representing clients in affirmative action, wage-and-hour, immigration compliance and employment policy audits.

With 11 offices across the western US, plus Washington, DC and Atlantic City, Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck is where business, law and politics converge. Founded in 1968, Brownstein provides an integrated approach that combines sensible business solutions with 20 years of Capitol Hill perspective. The firm's 250 lawyers and policy professionals have built a reputation for providing multidisciplinary legal counsel that drives results and connects business leaders to the information they need to make decisions.

Please visit http://www.bhfs.com for more information.

Ms. Samsel can be contacted at +1 303-223-1133 or csamsel@bhfs.com

Coming up in March 2020...

Human Resources: Confronting a Labor Shortage

With the unemployment rate at its lowest level in decades (3.7%), what has always been a perennial problem for human resource professionals - labor shortage - is now reaching acute levels of concern. It is getting harder to find and recruit qualified applicants. Even finding candidates with the skills to succeed in entry-level positions has become an issue. In addition, employee turnover rates remain extremely high in the hotel industry. As a result of these problems, hotel HR managers are having to rethink their recruitment strategies in order to hire the right talent for the right job. First, hotels have been forced to raise their wages and offer other appealing perks, as a way to attract qualified candidates. Secondly, HR managers are reassessing their interviewing techniques, focusing less on the answers they receive to questions and more on observable behavior. Part of this process includes role-playing during the interview, so that the recruiter can gauge how a candidate works through specific problems and interacts with other team members. Additionally, some HR managers are also creating internal talent pools as a way to address labor shortages. Instead of utilizing department resources to find new hires with specific skills for needed positions, hotels are cultivating talent pools internally and preparing their employees to assume leadership roles whenever the time comes. They are also placing greater emphasis on a company culture that is more performance-based, as a way to curb employee turnover, increase employee satisfaction, and assure higher levels of customer service. Finally, recognizing the importance of employee retention as a way to lessen the impact of a tight labor market, some HR managers are instituting generous reward programs in order to retain their top performers. The March Hotel Business Review will explore what some HR professionals are doing to address these and other issues in their departments.