Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Phillips

Luna Phillips

Shareholder, Gunster LLP

Luna Phillips is a Florida Bar board certified Gunster shareholder who practices in the area of environmental, administrative and governmental law. She leads the firm's Environmental practice.

Prior to joining the firm, Ms. Phillips was a senior attorney for the South Florida Water Management District and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection.

Ms. Phillips practices exclusively in the area of water and natural resources law before state and federal agencies. Her practice includes assisting large scale developers, agricultural entities, public and private companies, as well as individuals in a wide range of water related issues. Her experience ranges from water quality regulations such as TMDLs, to environmental resource permitting, to water use permitting, to sovereign state land and listed species approvals.

In addition, Ms. Phillips actively works on Everglades related restoration issues in south Florida involving complex restoration agreements with governmental entities and water quality and supply regulations. She provides more than two decades of experience in administrative law and litigation before the Division of Administrative Hearings (DOAH), as well as in rulemaking, public records and Sunshine law.

Ms. Phillips can be contacted at 954-712-1478 or lphillips@gunster.com

Coming up in November 2019...

Architecture & Design: Biophilic Design

The hospitality industry is constantly evolving to meet and exceed guest expectations. As a result, hotels are always on the lookout for new ways to improve the guest experience, and architecture and design is an essential part of this equation. Bold design is often the most effective way to make an exceptional first impression - an impression guests use to distinguish between brands. One design trend that is being embraced worldwide has become known as “Biophilic Design.” Biophilic design is based on the concept of biophilia, which is the theory that human beings have an innate tendency to seek out nature, natural elements, and natural forms. Biophilic design is more than hotels simply adding a surplus of plants; it involves incorporating specific design elements into a hotel in order to imbue it with a sense of wellness and well-being. Some of those elements include exposure to natural lighting; views of nature and rooms with a view; natural architectural patterns; salvaged or reclaimed woods of all types; reclaimed metals; sustainably sourced stone; living green walls and vertical gardens; and direct and indirect exposure to nature. Hotels that have incorporated biophilic design into their properties are reaping the benefits associated with this trend including reduced stress responses, better air quality, lower energy costs, and more positive guest reviews. Biophilic design has also been shown to improve guest moods and to satisfy consumer demand for environmental responsibility. Savvy hotel owners and managers are aware that nature-inspired elements enhance their guests' comfort and well-being, which is why this trend is becoming so prevalent. Biophilic design is just one topic in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.