Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Lattal

Darnell Lattal

President & CEO, Aubrey Daniels International

Darnell Lattal, as president and chief executive officer of Aubrey Daniels International, is a specialist in the design and implementation of behavior-based business strategies to achieve core initiatives. In partnership with her clients and through her extensive corporate engagements, Ms. Lattal has contributed to organizational redesign and change management, executive coaching, achieving high performance, performance measurement and behavior-based systems design, leadership and teamwork within and across organizational structures, succession planning and implementation, ethical decision-making and creating a solid leadership legacy based on self-awareness and self-management. Ms. Lattal is an internationally known consultant and author of several books including one on reducing stress in Japanese workplaces through the power of positive reinforcement and her most recent US book, A Good Day's Work about establishing conditions to promote ethics at work. She has recently begun to explore the issues related to sustainable business practices to promote both green initiatives and sustain worthy cultural practices at work. A frequent presenter at major association and corporate conferences and active contributor to media on current topics about ethics at work, Ms. Lattal's particular expertise is in the psychology of learning and designing sustainable and rapid change.

Ms. Lattal can be contacted at 678-904-6140 or info@aubreydaniels.com

Coming up in December 2019...

Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

According to a recent study, the hospitality industry accounted for 2.9 trillion dollars in sales and in the U.S. alone, was responsible for 1 in 9 jobs. In an industry of that scope and dimension, legal issues touch every aspect of a hotel's operation, and legal services are required in order to conform to all prevailing laws and regulations. Though not all hotels face the same issues, there are some industry-wide subjects that are of concern more broadly. One of those matters is the issue of immigration and how it affects the ability of hotels to recruit qualified employees. The hotel industry is currently facing a labor crisis; the U.S. Labor Department estimates that there are 600,000 unfilled jobs in the industry. Part of the problem contributing to this labor shortage is the lack of H2B visas for low-skilled workers, combined with the difficulty in obtaining J-1 visas for temporary workers. Because comprehensive immigration reform is not being addressed politically, hotel managers expect things are going to get worse before they get better. Corporate cyber security is another major legal issue the industry must address. Hotels are under enormous pressure in this area given the large volume of customer financial transactions they handle daily. Recently, a federal court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission had the power to regulate corporate cyber security, so it is incumbent on hotels to establish data security programs in order to prevent data breaches. The lack of such programs could cause hotels to face legal threats from government agencies, class action lawsuits, and damage to their brand image if a data breach should occur. These are just two of the critical issues that the December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.