The Reality Show of Service

By Roberta Nedry President and Founder, Hospitality Excellence, Inc. | May 19, 2010

The service landscape has changed in the past few years and hospitality leaders must recognize why anticipating and defining expectations may be more important than ever. People, customers, guests want the real thing. Especially after events like September 11, they want to feel more secure, more safe and more reassured that their interests and concerns matter. They don't want to feel like their needs play second fiddle to corporate policies, complex chains of command or misinformed employees. They want a real connection.

On a recent flight to Colorado, I experienced a reality quagmire. Two major airlines have a program to allow elite members of either airline to get the benefits of early boarding. On this particular flight, I was an elite member of the other partner airline and sought the shared early boarding benefit. The employee taking tickets did not know about the program and even employees who were aware of the program were unsure of what proof of elite membership could be accepted from the partner customer. As the elite member customer asking for the benefit, I was made to feel like my expectations were "unrealistic" when in fact the companies have presumably spent millions to invite customers to experience this benefit and feel good about both airlines. The employee's attitude and information were poor and we both suffered.

Customer reality suffers when employee reality is not consistently managed. The key to this is to have a single reality for customers and employees and manage customer benefits at the employee level. It is challenging to manage information at all levels with the plethora of web and direct mail promotions for hotels, airlines and other hospitality service providers. When a customer books through an online travel agent like Expedia or Travelocity or hundreds of others, is their reality penalized or does it suffer due to employees believing that that online customer is entitled to some alternated reality? Does it mean less service and other terms and conditions? Hospitality companies need to focus on what they want the final real result to be for all customers and then manage that experience through each possible source. Employees need the same care and attention that customers do when understanding what makes the experience what the company really wants for the customer.

When an employee does understand the power of real connections for customers and guests, the rewards are immediate. During a visit to two destinations in Florida, a Texas family experienced dramatic differences. The first one offered impressive grounds and facilities but employees at the front desk were rude, impatient and dismissive. The reality of paying $500 a night for accommodations did not seem to make a difference in service nor a genuine concern for positive memories beyond the physical location. They labeled their experience a "nightmare" and one which they would not repeat. Employees and those that managed them did not appear to care about making a real connection for their guests and allowed the physical property alone to do the work.

The second destination provided an immediate contrast with kind and caring staff immediately upon arrival. However, it went downhill from there with numerous problems with room service. Determined not to have another poor experience and get what they really wanted, they called to address the situation and were put off by unhelpful staff and unavailable supervisors. Frustrated again, the family resigned itself to an experience other that what they really wanted.

Finally, a senior room service supervisor surfaced and immediately changed the trip for the better. Once he heard the story, he found the family and personally apologized for all the problems. He assured them no more such experiences would occur. From that point on, that particular employee stayed in touch with these guests and extended kindness and special treatment that made them feel truly valued and appreciated. One employee who recognized what his guests really wanted really made a difference. Because of their experience and his real service commitment, this family plans to always return to this resort property for all future visits to this destination.

Coming up in January 2018...

Mobile Technology: Relentless Innovation

Technology has become a crucial component in attracting and retaining hotel guests, and the need to enhance a guest’s technology experience is driving a relentless pace of innovation. To meet and exceed guest expectations, 54% of hotels will spend more on technology in 2018, and mobile solutions in particular will top the list of capital investments. Many hotels are integrating mobile booking, mobile keys, mobile payments and mobile check-in into their operations. Other hotels are emphasizing the in-room experience, boosting bandwidth and upgrading flat screen TVs to more easily interface with guest mobile devices. And though not yet mainstream, there are many exciting technology developments on the near horizon. The Internet of Things (loT) is taking form in some places, and can be found in guest room control systems, voice activation systems, and in wearable sensors that can be used for access and payment options. Virtual reality headsets are available at some hotels so guests can enjoy virtual trips to exotic locations or if off-property, preview conference facilities and guest rooms. How long will it be before a hotel employs a fleet of robots for room service, or utilizes a hologram as a concierge, or installs gesture-controlled walls that feature interactive digital displays? Some hotels are already using augmented reality for translation services, or interactive wall maps, or even virtual décor. This pace of innovation is challenging property owners and brands to stay on top of the latest technology trends while still addressing current projects. The January Hotel Business Review will explore what some hotels are doing to maximize their opportunities in the mobile technology space.