Health Inspection: Set yourself up for success best practices for pest management

By Frank Meek International Technical & Training Director, Orkin, LLC | July 15, 2012

You work hard to keep your hotel clean and inviting for guests. Pests in a hotel setting can cause bad word-of-mouth and unhappy guests who may not return to your establishment. But beyond the bedroom walls, one critical area of your hotel when it comes to pest management is your restaurant.

A failed health inspection due to a pest sighting in a restaurant or kitchen can be devastating, resulting in bad word-of-mouth or a potential shut down. Lets take a look at which pests are most attracted to your facility, pest hotspots that are cause for concern and how to deter pest entry all information that will help you to prepare for your next health inspection.

A successful Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program seeks to limit chemical usage by reducing conditions that attract pests. IPM techniques like facility maintenance and proactive sanitation practices can go a long way in restricting pests access to sources of food, water and shelter. An IPM program also relies on a strong partnership among you, your pest management professional and your employees. To avoid the often costly repercussions of a poor health inspection score, work with your staff and a pest management professional to be prepared for your next health inspection.

Why Pests Are Attracted to Restaurants

Delicious food, smells, warm temperatures all the same things that we enjoy from a restaurant are also enjoyed by pests. The odor from the presence of food, water and optimal temperatures are what attracts pests to begin with, but its certainly hard to reduce these conditions in the midst of a busy mealtime at your restaurant.

Four of the most likely pest guests looking to book a stay in hotel restaurants are flies, cockroaches, rodents and stored-product pests.

Coming up in February 2018...

Social Media: Engagement is Key

There are currently 2.3 billion active users of social media networks and savvy hotel operators have incorporated social media into their marketing mix. There are a few Goliath channels on which one must have a presence (Facebook & Twitter) but there are also several newer upstart channels (Instagram, Snapchat &WeChat, for example) that merit consideration. With its 1.86 billion users, Facebook is a dominant platform where operators can drive brand awareness, facilitate bookings, offer incentives and collect sought-after reviews. Twitter's 284 million users generate 500 million tweets per day, and operators can use its platform for lead generation, building loyalty, and guest interaction. Instagram was originally a small photo-sharing site but it has blown up into a massive photo and video channel. The site can be used to post photos of the hotel property, as well as creating Instagram Stories - personal videos that disappear from the channel after 24 hours. In this regard, Instagram and Snapchat are now in direct competition. WeChat is a Chinese company whose aim is to be the App for Everything - instant messaging, social media, shopping and payment services - all in a single platform. In addition to these channels, blogging continues to be a popular method to establish leadership, enhance reputations, and engage with customers in a direct and personal way. The key to effective use of all social media is to find out where your customers are and then, to the fullest extent possible, engage with them on a personal level. This engagement is what creates a personal connection and sustains brand loyalty. The February Hotel Business Review will explore these issues and examine how some hotels are successfully integrating social media into their operations.