A Disaster Preparedness Guide: How to Plan Before, During & After an Event

By Richard Dahm Senior Risk Consultant, National Hospitality Division, Wells Fargo Insurance Services | November 08, 2013

In the last five years the United States and countries around the world have witnessed many major natural disasters. Such disasters include hurricanes, tornados, tsunamis, severe windstorms and catastrophic flood damage that have left businesses, large and small, unable to recoup from their loss. Damage assessments by risk management and loss control specialists find to often preventative measures could have been implemented that would in part or significantly reduce the overall cost of a claim or the length of recovery time. The intent of this guide is to help business owners in the planning process for preparing and implementing an emergency plan. One that is activated before, during, and after an event.

PRE-EVENT PLANNING

  • Develop an Emergency Action Plan (EAP) and an Emergency Response Team (ERT).
    If you do not have one, consult your insurance broker or Risk Consultant to
    help with the implementation.

  • Members of the ERT should understand their specific roles and the overall goal and procedures outlined in the EAP. Members (with alternatives to cover
    all hours of operation) should also be trained to carry out their specified
    responsibilities.

  • The ERT leader should have authority to implement the EAP based on predetermined benchmarks.

  • Responsibilities should include when to shut down operations and send personnel home.

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