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Zoe Connolly

More often than not, the wish list a recruiter's been handed is a purple squirrel of sorts. This can work as long as there is flexibility, but that isn't always the case. Companies can get stuck on the requirements, but it's never a great thing to be to firm with requirements (unless the job is ‘doctor' or ‘pilot'). The best teams are made up of people that respect the organization, respect the vision, get along well with others and are able to excel in helping other team members improve their own proficencies. This is a yin and yang way to look at your team; finding candidates who help mask weaknesses. Read on...

Ashish Modak

Hotels and especially luxury hotels are glamorous in their appeal, their style quotient and the wow feel they deliver to all their patrons. And every hotel and resort has its set of superstars who perform their acts to perfection. Very often these very stars are celebrated and written about. But, how about the secret armour that every hotel carries in its back offices and hidden troves? This essay attempts to bring forth the contribution of many such superstars who work day in and day out in quiet anonymity through their careers. It is time for all hotel managers to celebrate the contributions made by these teams who truly form the nervous system of the hotel world. Read on...

Brenda McGregor

In an industry where so much depends on a hotel management company's ability to deploy motivated, experienced and talented people, attracting and retaining high-quality employees is an urgent-and constant-priority, especially today. It's one thing to say "we need good people" and another thing to make it happen. Brenda McGregor, Vice President of Human Resources at Chesapeake Hospitality, offers critical insight about how companies can boost their recruiting and retention efforts to attract top talent. Let's take a look at some of her expert tips and the company's best practices that have translated into a strong industry retention rate and defined company culture. Read on...

Peter Stark

All current research regarded to labor indicates that there will continue to be a shortage of well qualified workers in the future. In a recent survey commissioned by Indeed, they found that over 50% of US workers are thinking of making a career change. As we approach the new year, this is one of the most frequent times that employees think about changing jobs. What are you doing to create the workplace where once employees enter, they remain fully engaged, committing their time, talent, and enthusiasm to ensure the success of the organization? Read on...

Kim Grennan

Freelancers and independent contractors are at the forefront of the New Economy. Hotel executives have the opportunity to work with members of this global network of experts and professionals. This movement benefits employers and employees alike, enhancing quality and increasing efficiency. These benefits can be an advantage for the hospitality industry as a whole, as talent expands and choice grows at an exponential rate. Seizing this chance to innovate is one that hotel executives can leverage regionally, nationally or internationally. These facts illustrate the strengths of the New Economy and its worldwide influence. Welcome to the beginning of a new chapter in business leadership. Read on...

Zoe Connolly

While graduation is mostly over, the workforce is still adjusting to an influx of recent college grads. In hotels, leadership and hiring managers have likely already met multiple candidates in making an addition to the staff, and in some cases, making the decision to hold off. It can be hard to choose the right candidate for the job for many reasons, but there are ways hiring managers can identify candidates that will ultimately be successful in their roles. Read on...

Dawn Miller Sander

Do you smile when you think about or see Lucille Ball, Carol Burnett or Chris Rock? Chances are you do... "What do these folks have to do with my hotel property?" you are most likely asking yourself. Study after study confirms that happy teams produce amazing results in the following areas: increased productivity, improved revenues, and higher employee engagement. Imagine how satisfied your guests will be when you and your team add joy to your property! Read on...

Megan Schuyler

By nature of the hotel industry, it can be challenging to find and keep talent. There are many overnight and hourly positions to fill, both year-round and during peak travel season. However, when considering the high rate of turnover and the high cost of that turnover, it is apparent that hotels should, not only develop a solid pipeline of candidates, but fill that pipeline with the potential employees who fit into the organization. As the war for talent continues, hotels and other business must get more creative in their recruiting and retention efforts. Read on...

Mark Heymann

While the workplace continues its rapid move towards a "gig economy," recent National Labor Relations Board rulings have made it tougher for employers to classify workers as independent contractors vs. employees. That could change, however, under the new administration, which has signaled it could scale back federal protections of workers in favor of more employer-friendly policies. Add to that the uncertain future of healthcare requirements and the big questions are: Will independent contractors find a steady place in the hospitality industry? And what will be the advantages and disadvantages of working as a contractor versus a full-time employee? Read on...

Michael Schubach

There was a time during the tumultuous 60s and 70s that the younger generation was admonished to "never trust anyone over thirty." You may have heard that quote - it was made a cultural touchstone by the likes of luminaries such as Abbie Hoffman, Jerry Rubin and the Beatles. Today, members of the older generation seem to apply the opposite perspective - it's hard to trust anyone under thirty. Employers talk about a new generation of workers with a "me first" mentality who place more value on their own entertainment than on company loyalty and work output. Read on...

Michael Doyle

This article highlights the benefits and available options of third party outsourcing for hotels. Hotels have historically outsource services to restaurant operators, parking and audio visual professionals, with resorts often outsourcing recreational services and landscaping as well. Today's options for outsourcing are much broader, as new firms have developed business models to provide expertise with greater efficiency at lower costs. Have you considered outsourcing your entire housekeeping operation? How about stewarding, overnight cleaning, or laundry operations? Other options could be banquet services, night cleaning, HVAC Services or Accounting Services. Read on...

Zoe Connolly

Traditionally, hotels were most exposed to staff turnover in January, a timeframe directly after the holiday season had ended and corresponding holiday bonuses had been paid out. Today however, as many large hotels report their annual earnings in March, the timeline has shifted, and hotel leaders find themselves facing uncertain employee retention issues as we enter the second quarter of the year. Employees and hotel leadership alike should look at April as an opportunity to further develop career paths, either through open and honest dialogue that clearly establishes next steps within a career path, or through a change in role. Read on...

Mark Heymann

As a growing number of cities and states legislate minimum wage hikes, hotel operators might be tempted to respond with a hiring freeze to avoid higher labor costs. This article explores the potential negative impacts hotels risk with a halt-on-hiring approach as well as more effective ways to offset higher wages. The not-so-simple truth is that increasing the minimum wage will require hoteliers to take a more measured look at their business in specific time periods. They'll need to understand the wage increase impact at peak and non-peak times, and determine what their true minimum staffing levels can be while still servicing customers to their expectations. Read on...

Paul Feeney

A recent report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, showed that close to 3 million people voluntarily quit their jobs a couple of years ago, a 17% increase from the previous year, proving that opportunities for employees are abundant and we have shifted back to a candidate-driven marketplace. Why is this important? Employee retention should always be of utmost importance, but requires awareness as to why employees leave to begin with. Numerous statistics show that the #1 reason people quit their jobs is a disconnect or poor relationship with their boss or immediate supervisor or manager. This shows that turnover of staff is mostly a manager issue. Read on...

Joyce Gioia

Worldwide, the hospitality industry is going through a transformation. In response to workforce shortages, many employers have looked for---and found---ways to reduce staff by using automation. Despite this trend, there are continuing shortages of skilled workers from front line housekeepers to general managers. Hospitality leaders are looking for and finding innovative ways to find the talent. This article will give you an overview of what's working for general managers and their human resource professionals to find the people they need to staff their properties. Read on...

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Coming up in March 2018...

Human Resources: Value Creation

Businesses must evolve to stay competitive and this is also true of employment positions within those organizations. In the hotel industry, for example, the role that HR professionals perform continues to broaden and expand. Today, they are generally responsible for five key areas - government compliance; payroll and benefits; employee acquisition and retention; training and development; and organizational structure and culture. In this enlarged capacity, HR professionals are no longer seen as part of an administrative cost center, but rather as a member of the leadership team that creates strategic value within their organization. HR professionals help to define company policies and plans; enact and enforce systems of accountability; and utilize definable metrics to measure and justify outcomes. Of course, there are always new issues for HR professionals to address. Though seemingly safe for the moment, will the Affordable Care Act ultimately be repealed and replaced and, if so, what will the ramifications be? There are issues pertaining to Millennials in the workforce and women in leadership roles, as well as determining the appropriate use of social media within the organization. There are new onboarding processes and e-learning training platforms to evaluate, in addition to keeping abreast of political issues like the minimum wage hike movement, or the re-evaluation of overtime rules. Finally, there are genuine immigration and deportation issues that affect HR professionals, especially if they are located in Dreamer Cities, or employ a workforce that could be adversely impacted by federal government policies. The March Hotel Business Review will take a look at some of the issues, strategies and techniques that HR professionals are employing to create and sustain value in their organization.