Library Archives

 
Mike Paton

Today's hotel guest is more informed and demanding than ever. With dozens of choices at the fingertips of potential guests, how can your hotel rise above the crowd? To capture a bigger share of the market, your employees must focus on delivering more bang for the buck than your competition. Otherwise, guests decide where to stay primarily based on price and location. And that means you're nothing more than a commodity to most of your customers. Hotels with a guest-centered sales culture outperform competitors by building more value into every guest interaction. When your sales and service team is dedicated to providing a special experience for each traveler, you create preference and loyalty with your guests. And that helps you fill your hotel at a higher rate. Sounds simple, right? Anyone who's tried to build and maintain a sales culture knows it's not easy. But in working with more than 5,000 companies since 1986, we've found that it can be done by following three basic steps... Read on...

Jason Ferrara

The hospitality industry is in the business of making people feel at home when they're away from home. The employees decide whether the guests have a positive or negative experience and, either way, those guests will talk about it. That is why it is so critical that hotels and lodging facilities take measures today to ensure that they have those top performers on staff that will provide guests with an optimum experience and keep them coming back. According to a recent nationwide survey from CareerBuilder.com, nearly six-in-ten hospitality workers say they plan to leave their current jobs in pursuit of better opportunities by the end of 2005. To better understand the impetus behind this wake-up call for employers, let's take a closer look at what factors are driving dissatisfaction with their current positions. Read on...

Jason Ferrara

The US Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that hospitality jobs will increase 17 percent through 2012; meanwhile, the industry's turnover rate was nearly twice that of all occupations last month. The magnitude of the industry's turnover is demonstrated by a recent nationwide survey by CareerBuilder.com. According to the survey, about 12 percent of hospitality workers plan to leave their jobs in the fourth quarter of 2005. Read on...

Robert Plotka

Rehabilitation and adaptive reuse of our nation's historic and pre-1936 buildings continue to be a hot trend in the real estate development industry, particularly as many American cities promote and encourage urban renewal projects in their downtown and historic areas. In most cases, it takes more than deep pockets and the divine inspiration of the developer to bring a historic building back to life. developers involved in rehabilitating historic buildings should promote teamwork, include experienced professionals, and expect the unexpected. A critical success factor is the developer's willingness and ability to assemble a strong team of experienced professionals to carry out the project. With a strong development team, the project may not only run more smoothly but also be perceived more favorably by investors and lenders while obtaining better terms in the process. Here are some helpful hints when selecting development team members for a historic rehabilitation tax credit project: Read on...

Jason Ferrara

Workplace diversity is hardly a new notion. The push for diversity gained prominence in the 1970s and 1980s as an influx of women entered the workforce. When EEOC reporting requirements emerged in the 1990s, the concept took on even greater importance. Today, embracing diversity means far more than creating more and equal opportunities for black and Hispanic workers. Diversity initiatives also benefit Asians, Native Americans, women, people with disabilities, and gay and lesbian workers. Read on...

Sandy Heydt

Raise your hand if you have had a bad boss. I am sure everyone reading this has raised both hands, and raised them pretty quickly! We often remember our bad bosses more readily than we do our good ones, because the experience was so unpleasant and disappointing. And sometimes we are so harmed by the experience it can take us a long time to get over it. Now think about the good bosses you have had. I hope you have had at least one in your career. Why were they good? Why was the experience working for them so invigorating and memorable? Wouldn't you like to create such an environment for anyone under your area of supervision? Read on...

Neale Redington

Despite millions of unemployed workers, there is an acute shortage of talent across industries. The hotel industry is no exception and with this industry growing at an exponential rate, the talent shortage hits especially hard. As more facilities are opening to tourists, hotels are in dire need of general managers to implement human resource strategies that build a foundation and reputation for a positive work environment, sales managers that are committed to the customer's needs, and housekeeping staff that understands and respects the importance of image - just to cite a few examples. Read on...

Steven Belmonte

How often do you as a hotel owner or manager stop to help an employee who may be struggling to keep up with his or her day-to-day tasks? What have you done to motivate the employee who simply doesn't care about doing a good job or going the extra mile to please a guest because it's just a job, a way to collect a paycheck?. With no risk and no up-front-cost, hoteliers can increase a line-level employees' take-home pay by as much as $130 a month, provide better voluntary benefits to employees, and thus decrease employee turnover. Read on...

Jason Ferrara

It takes a lot of people to make a hotel feel like home for its guests. So it's not surprising that the hospitality industry is a major component of the overall U.S. labor force. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the accommodations and food services industry makes up 8.1 percent of all employment. And Americans aren't abandoning their vacations or business outings anytime soon. The hospitality industry is expected to grow 18 percent and add more than 1.6 million new jobs through 2012, according to BLS data. But while we're in the business of making others feel cared for, the labor market won't be very comfortable for hospitality employers in coming years. Read on...

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Coming up in March 2018...

Human Resources: Value Creation

Businesses must evolve to stay competitive and this is also true of employment positions within those organizations. In the hotel industry, for example, the role that HR professionals perform continues to broaden and expand. Today, they are generally responsible for five key areas - government compliance; payroll and benefits; employee acquisition and retention; training and development; and organizational structure and culture. In this enlarged capacity, HR professionals are no longer seen as part of an administrative cost center, but rather as a member of the leadership team that creates strategic value within their organization. HR professionals help to define company policies and plans; enact and enforce systems of accountability; and utilize definable metrics to measure and justify outcomes. Of course, there are always new issues for HR professionals to address. Though seemingly safe for the moment, will the Affordable Care Act ultimately be repealed and replaced and, if so, what will the ramifications be? There are issues pertaining to Millennials in the workforce and women in leadership roles, as well as determining the appropriate use of social media within the organization. There are new onboarding processes and e-learning training platforms to evaluate, in addition to keeping abreast of political issues like the minimum wage hike movement, or the re-evaluation of overtime rules. Finally, there are genuine immigration and deportation issues that affect HR professionals, especially if they are located in Dreamer Cities, or employ a workforce that could be adversely impacted by federal government policies. The March Hotel Business Review will take a look at some of the issues, strategies and techniques that HR professionals are employing to create and sustain value in their organization.