Library Archives

 
Donna Brokowski

The relationship between business travel buyers (the customer), the travel management company (TMC), and hotels has evolved since the beginning of travel management into one of interdependency. The hotelier must understand the TMC/customer relationship in order for hotels to work more effectively with TMCs to establish, build, and maintain their relationships with the customer. Read on...

Amber Fox

Not too long ago, I was researching for a presentation that I needed to deliver during an annual conference for a major hotel brand. The topic was networking and this brand had seen a drop in personal interactive skills of staff at all levels. People in all roles - front desk, sales, even managers and owners - were losing their ability to connect with others due to their reliance on electronic tools. Being in the world of hospitality, where a premium should be placed on service and relationships, this void was seen as critical. Read on...

Allyson Fredeen

Upon graduating from Colorado State University's department of Design & Merchandising in 2004, I had no idea that my undergrad learnings would come into play during my hospitality career, over a decade later. Nor did I realize I would depart from the fashion/retail industry for the hotel business. I will always remember one of my professor's lectures on what merchandising really is: having the right product, at the right time, in the right place. It sounds quite simple, but putting this philosophy into action is more complex. Read on...

Tara K. Gorman

Branded residential projects offer all the comforts of "home" with the luxury, prestige and high level of services offered at a hotel. This is not as easy as it may appear at first blush and savvy developers are jumping into the branded residential sector with an eye toward high level design and quality, as well as, a keen sense of what the potential purchaser is ultimately seeking. The key to a successful branded residential project is the integration of the hotel services and amenities with the security and privacy of residential living. If done well, this can be quite profitable for the developer as the branded residential real estate market is on the upswing with enhanced sales velocity over unbranded residential real estate by 20 - 30%, especially in emerging markets. This article will take an in-depth view at branded residential reality and recent reemergence of branded residential reality. Read on...

Toni Portmann

In the ongoing power struggle between hotels and online travel agencies, one question that often emerges is, "Who owns the guest?" It's a question that will likely be debated for years, and grow even more complicated as new players continue to enter the online travel arena. The answer, DHISCO CEO Toni Portmann, argues, is "no one and everyone." And rather than argue over who should have access to customer email and other information, she says, they should look to new technology for managing rates and inventory and sharing richer content as the bridge to more amicable relationships. Read on...

H. Stuart Foster

Like never before, marketers are competing for attention. Snapchat Spectacles, Instagram Stories, 360-degree videos and Facebook Live are all helping fill consumers' free time. So, as marketers, how do we use all the data now available to figure out how to get the right stories out on social media, smartphones, tablets and other channels? And how do we make our content interesting enough to compete with the fad du jour occupying people's minds? I challenge myself and my team to think about three key means to earn attention in today's marketplace. Read on...

Sapna Mehta Mangal

The 21st century discerning digital native traveler can be clearly characterized as hyper connected, better informed, and technology savvy. In this "Age of I" hotel brands need to gain a competitive edge by taking heed of these guests and making them feel interconnected. The next frontier is undoubtedly clear and real. This write up will focus on three marketing trends that need attention and if executed can be of grave value to any hotel businesses' marketing efforts. Mobile marketing platforms, predictive analytics strategies and contextual marketing tactics are new hotel marketing frontiers. Hoteliers cannot lose sight of these in the next decade. Read on...

Henry  Woodman

The booking shift to mobile in the travel industry raises questions on how marketers can adjust their strategies to reach a mobile audience. This in conjunction with quickly evolving virtual reality technology opens doors for travel marketers to make an impact and get ahead of their competition. Using VR to enhance mobile websites, apps and advertising can increase mobile bookings and raise brand awareness and credibility. Read on...

Jeffrey Hirsch

The hospitality industry is swimming with data. Torrents of data are churned out daily from traditional marketing research, social media, email and rating apps such as Yelp. We all prefer to may fact-based decisions, but unfortunately, there are times when the facts simply don't matter. Perceptions, no matter irrationally formed, are always more important when it comes to brand choice, particularly in the hospitality business. Making a hotel reservation is far more than a simple transaction, and often relies far less on reason than emotion. That's why qualitative research must have a place in hospitality brand's marketing mix. Read on...

Aron Ezra

Gamification, the use of game-like elements to make promotions, loyalty programs and staff training more engaging, is experiencing a resurgence in the hospitality industry. After initial missteps, hotels are using a new breed of games to boost their customers' spend per visit, increase market share and motivate their staff. Not only does gamification open a world of possibilities for making the industry more profitable and productive, it makes the guest and employee experience more fun. By focusing on the brand new metric of "enjoyability," hospitality companies are tapping into a rich new source of data, differentiating their brand in a crowded field, and driving extraordinary results. Read on...

Bonnie Knutson

Developing a positioning strategy may seem like a daunting task. After all, there are countless how-to books written about it. Industry magazines are awash with articles about how this hotel did it or that hotel did it. And then there are the presentations at industry conferences, corporate meetings, seminars, webinars, ad infinitum. Not to mention the many consultants out there. All of these sources are valuable and can provide significant insights into marketing your hotel. But the sheer numbers of resources that are available make the whole thing seem mind boggling and complicated. It's not. It's not because there are basically four - and only four -- positioning strategies any hotel can adopt. Think of them as your marketing's Four Strategic Aces. In this article, you'll read about the four different strategies and why your hotel should adopt only one. Read on...

Bonnie Knutson

This article is designed to help anyone in the hotel industry answer the challenge of hotel marketing in the 21st Century. It is built on my belief [1] that marketers have overly complicated the marketing process, [2] that marketing is dynamic, constantly evolving to meet the changing needs, wants, and expectations of people and organizations, and [3] that the reasoning behind the AMA's newly revised definition is right on target. In it, you'll read about the three legs that are necessary to support the marketing milk stool for hotels in this increasingly fragmented and competitive global environment. Read on...

Maite Vélez-Couto

Effectively communicating brand messages to current and future guests remains an essential business strategy for any hotel. More and more, companies are turning to influencers to reach a broader audience and help boost sales. But not every brand or hotel has mastered the complexity of these partnerships nor are they really sure how to best measure their success. Although there are three basic elements to influencer engagement - plan, research and measure - the key is in the nuances. Read on...

Laurence Bernstein

Just when we thought the "branding" fetish of hotel owners and operators had retreated into the back-reaches of the mind, replaced by design fetishes or mobile fetishes or OTA neuroses - just when we though we'd wrestled the branding beast to the ground - just when we thought we had branded all that could be branded (and sub-branded, co-branded, extended, and the rest), the wretched word reappears, wrapped in the disguise of "re". Re-brand; re-fresh, re-position, re-frame, re-articulate, re-contextualize - an entire universe of "do-it-again-branding" to confuse, confound, and just plain con hotel owners, operators and marketers. The reason is not complicated: branding is an ongoing process, and as tastes competitive environment changes, so must the hotel's brand change. The question is: how much does the brand need to change, and how profound does the change have to be. In other words, is a re-brand, re-positioning, refreshing, re-articulation or re-what? In this article we look at the differences between the re's and when which is appropriate. Read on...

Erich Zuri

In under a decade 50% of all travelers will be between the ages of 44 and 28. Travel for meetings, conferences, and knowledge sharing will undoubtedly play a role. Millennials will also be front and center in planning and hosting business gatherings, and Gen X and Boomers will also continue to be strongly in the mix. This generational mash-up, and the intersecting meteoric rise in technology, poses new and interesting challenges and opportunities for marketing hotels globally. Hotels need to create forward looking, fresh ways to engage with planners -- especially online -- tipping tradition on its head and straddling generations more creatively. Read on...

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Coming up in February 2018...

Social Media: Engagement is Key

There are currently 2.3 billion active users of social media networks and savvy hotel operators have incorporated social media into their marketing mix. There are a few Goliath channels on which one must have a presence (Facebook & Twitter) but there are also several newer upstart channels (Instagram, Snapchat &WeChat, for example) that merit consideration. With its 1.86 billion users, Facebook is a dominant platform where operators can drive brand awareness, facilitate bookings, offer incentives and collect sought-after reviews. Twitter's 284 million users generate 500 million tweets per day, and operators can use its platform for lead generation, building loyalty, and guest interaction. Instagram was originally a small photo-sharing site but it has blown up into a massive photo and video channel. The site can be used to post photos of the hotel property, as well as creating Instagram Stories - personal videos that disappear from the channel after 24 hours. In this regard, Instagram and Snapchat are now in direct competition. WeChat is a Chinese company whose aim is to be the App for Everything - instant messaging, social media, shopping and payment services - all in a single platform. In addition to these channels, blogging continues to be a popular method to establish leadership, enhance reputations, and engage with customers in a direct and personal way. The key to effective use of all social media is to find out where your customers are and then, to the fullest extent possible, engage with them on a personal level. This engagement is what creates a personal connection and sustains brand loyalty. The February Hotel Business Review will explore these issues and examine how some hotels are successfully integrating social media into their operations.