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Michael Hymanson

This article identifies some of the risks that Hotel owners and operators face, and provides a guideline for Hotel Owners and operators to utilize various security measures to assist in identifying, preparing for and mitigating risk. Hotels and specifically hoteliers have been providing lodging and other hospitality services for guests for centuries. From humble beginnings as rests for pilgrims and other travelers to the gleaming mega structures that abound today, the most respected hoteliers provide not only comfort but one of the most important basic needs—safety. Read on...

Bruce McIndoe

Security personnel and electronic surveillance do not typically offer sufficient coverage of hotel premises. Hotel employees play an important and crucial role in hotel security as they interact with guests, visitors and vendors in the regular course of business. Staff may be trained to mindfully look out for, identify, and report suspicious activity, giving security staff and hotel management the necessary intelligence and early warning upon which they may act to prevent crime or attacks against the hotel or its residents. Read on...

Craig Schwab

Hotels face a universal challenge: how to manage security without encroaching on guests' privacy and experience. Hoteliers need to artfully juggle providing discreet security for their guests while ensuring that their stays are pleasurable. Due to their open-access nature, hotels present significant challenges to the management and security team. New York security professional, Craig Schwab's article titled, "Access Control: Best Practices for After-Hours Operation" features tips for hotel management to implement as part of their business operations to ensure the safety and security of their guests, staff and visitors. Read on...

Anthony C. Roman

How often can we change an existing operational expense, into a cost saving enterprise? The security department is an often overlooked source of substantial expense reduction. It may pay for you to perform a cost-benefit analysis of security operations considering all related losses suffered across your business models. In this analysis, the associated insurance, legal, contractual and regulatory costs affected by these losses should be factored. The impact of negative press reports and its brand tarnishing effects can be quantified in lost revenue due to shifting customer loyalty as well. Read on...

Maurizio Manetti

Over the last several years, hotel security monitoring systems have evolved into useful tools that enhance overall safety and security. CCTV systems are of crucial importance when it comes to maintaining a secure property and providing safety for guests. New digital technology, such as high-definition and larger digital storage options have changed the way this technology can be used in these monitoring systems. Read on...

Michael Khairallah

Guest safety is a top concern in hotels but inadequate lighting or landscaping that can conceal perpetrators can reduce guest safety and increase hotel liability risks. This article points out some of the more common failings in lighting and landscaping designs and provides suggestions on improving security. It addresses lighting around the perimeter of hotel properties and especially parking lots and addresses the difficulties in providing attractive landscaping with good security. Read on...

Edward Dublois

There has never been a time more significant than the past 10 years that has caused many hotel and lodging professionals to move security up the line in terms of importance and criticality. Across the nation, substantial dollars are being spent to establish, upgrade or enhance security in a wide range of applications. Often these increased measures of security cameras, restricted access control, employee training, panic systems, covert surveillance and overall awareness incrementally decrease the risk and threat levels of a lodging or resort property. However, is there a possibility that these efforts can be further improved upon to deliver a greater return on investment? Read on...

There is a constant reminder that video monitoring has become an important part of the business world and the hospitality industry is no exception. The constant bombardment of technology demonstrated in television programs and movies depict sophisticated monitoring and equipment that a large portion of the traveling public truly believes exists in every environment. As a result the demands for sophisticated Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) systems continue to challenge manufacturers and the industry is responding with impressive analytics and capabilities for all environments including hotels and resorts. Read on...

Bernard Robinson

Reviewing and employing proactive safety and security measures during the holiday season presents challenges within itself. This is magnified during holiday travels. Moreover, the security measures mentioned above are merely suggestions and are not intended to be official list of measures to take. Being aware of your surroundings, communicating with your family or travel companions and careful planning drives travel safety and security. Remember that the holiday is a joyous occasion, but security and safety must come first. Read on...

Richard Hudak

Resort security is no longer a second or third priority. Real dangers exist resulting in loss of life, destruction of property and ruined business reputation. Guests, patrons and public opinion fed by the media, expect reasonable safety and security at resorts where they vacation. Executive management must revisit their priorities and provide additional budgeting and organizational support for security. If the existing Security Manager or Director is not qualified for appointment to the Executive Management Team, a replacement should be hired. Finally, resort security officers, their appearance, ability to communicate and how professionally they respond, reflect the reputation of the resort and the competency of resort management. The consequence of inadequate security should not be underestimated. Read on...

Marc Glasser

The Security and Safety Awareness: High ROI article highlights advantages, challenges, and key elements of an effective hotel security and safety awareness program. When appropriately managed such a program equates to a high Return On Investment (ROI). Key program elements include: senior management buy-in; accountable program manager; adequate resources; accurate information and documentation; and communication, collaboration and training. These elements will contribute to high ROI by enhancing the protection of life; reducing or avoiding incident related injuries, reducing legal liabilities; safeguarding tangible and intangible assets, including enhancing the "hotel customer experience" which can have a significant impact on the hotel's and corporate ROI. Read on...

Elizabeth Johnson

Guest safety and security are not the sole responsibility of a property's security or risk management team. Every hotel employee plays a role in maintaining the security of the property and its guests. Therefore, training in basic security awareness and response is a necessary component of every employee's orientation and continued training, no matter what department they work in. Security training issues to be covered include protecting guests' information and assets, recognizing and reporting unsafe conditions, fire prevention, and anti-terrorism awareness. Read on...

Jim Suggs

Good news for hotels: they need not sacrifice hospitality to security. Whether a property is established or in the early stages of planning, its design can achieve both attractive and functional security features. Such features can facilitate the operations and technology of a well trained, coordinated security team at the same time that they provide guests with pleasant, inviting visuals. Read on...

Chad Callaghan

Hotel Executives are not expected to be insurers of guests' safety and security; however they do have a legal duty to provide reasonable measures for their protection. Decisions about security staffing or physical security measures should not be based solely on cost implications or occupancy levels, but instead should be based on a risk assessment that determines both the threats to the hotel and the vulnerabilities of the hotel. Only after knowing what the risks to the hotel are should mitigation measures be put in place. Mitigation measures need not be all encompassing, but instead may start with simple solutions and escalate as necessary. Read on...

Frank Meek

The new year is just around the corner, so why not make a New Year's resolution to re-examine your current pest management program? As a best practice, take time to outline a strategy for the coming year that will help you safeguard against an infestation and protect your facility's reputation and bottom line. Learn tips on how to work with a pest management professional to avoid bad word of mouth, implement staff training and stay on top of the newest pest management treatments and technologies. Will you be prepared for pest management in 2012? Read on...

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Coming up in March 2018...

Human Resources: Value Creation

Businesses must evolve to stay competitive and this is also true of employment positions within those organizations. In the hotel industry, for example, the role that HR professionals perform continues to broaden and expand. Today, they are generally responsible for five key areas - government compliance; payroll and benefits; employee acquisition and retention; training and development; and organizational structure and culture. In this enlarged capacity, HR professionals are no longer seen as part of an administrative cost center, but rather as a member of the leadership team that creates strategic value within their organization. HR professionals help to define company policies and plans; enact and enforce systems of accountability; and utilize definable metrics to measure and justify outcomes. Of course, there are always new issues for HR professionals to address. Though seemingly safe for the moment, will the Affordable Care Act ultimately be repealed and replaced and, if so, what will the ramifications be? There are issues pertaining to Millennials in the workforce and women in leadership roles, as well as determining the appropriate use of social media within the organization. There are new onboarding processes and e-learning training platforms to evaluate, in addition to keeping abreast of political issues like the minimum wage hike movement, or the re-evaluation of overtime rules. Finally, there are genuine immigration and deportation issues that affect HR professionals, especially if they are located in Dreamer Cities, or employ a workforce that could be adversely impacted by federal government policies. The March Hotel Business Review will take a look at some of the issues, strategies and techniques that HR professionals are employing to create and sustain value in their organization.