Library Archives

 
Casey Olsen

If you were to look at your mid week business and reflect on your occupancy, meaning treatment room occupancy, you will get an idea of how your spa business can improve. We've all designed those lovely mid-week packages, that are a great deal, but it seems that few often work enough to fill those treatment rooms during the week, unless there are guests already planning to come to your property. Having created such packages for years and tracked their success, they do little to motivate the guest that had no intention of taking a vacation at the time your package is targeted, however, they can be the reason why they chose your spa over another. So, although you may not think that they are worth the marketing efforts, do no dispense with them. They are offered by your competitors and a potential guest will take note and compare. Read on...

Peggy Borgman

About ten years ago, spa receptionists came of age. Shedding the gum-smacking image of the salon receptionist, these front line employees were renamed "spa concierges" and "spa coordinators." No longer did they simply book appointments, check clients in and out, and catch up on the salon gossip between customers. Spas had evolved, and their receptionists were now part of a professional customer-care team... Read on...

Peggy Borgman

Hospitality spas are highly vulnerable to branding disconnect. "Branding" often occurs at the corporate level, far away from a spa's employee training programs. Marketing spins gorgeous fantasies to lure customers in and Operations deals with gritty day to day realities, often completely unaware of the marketing promise. When the two contrast sharply, the brand can be badly damaged. Read on...

Kurt A. Broadhag

Hotel fitness centers are no different than basic health clubs when it comes to decision making on equipping their facilities. Major prohibiting factors including space and budget limitations require management to make smart choices on equipment procurement. These choices are influential in determining equipment quantities and quality with defined specifications unique to each setting. Taking time to research proper selection early on in the design process will not only save money and reduce liability long-term but will allow hotel operators to develop their fitness center around the guests needs. Read on...

Peter Anderson

Not only is payroll the largest single expense item on your profit and loss statement, but it's important to remember that spa clients generally only interface with line employees, such as their massage therapist or esthetician. If professionalism is not engrained into the fabric of your corporate culture and your employees are not truly enthusiastic about your operation, you may be setting yourself up for problems. Read on...

Casey Olsen

The number one issue that is continually overlooked by the architects of record on spa facilities is flow. It seems that if an architect has not experienced numerous spas first hand, and by experienced, I mean actually have been a guest and used the spa services often, they do not possess the necessary experience that will provide them with all the nuances of what makes a health spa facility a success, from both an aesthetic view and an operational view. Read on...

Casey Olsen

Hot! Hot! Hot! Condo hotels are burning hot. Across the country and around the world, the development communities have discovered the concept of the condo hotel. However, it is no longer enough to create a residential development with the standard pool, restaurant and tennis court or a hotel with little of the resort type enticements. Your market now demands much more. Read on...

Gayle Bulls Dixon

The spa is often a leading driver for many guests as they make hotel/resort selections. In fact, consumers seek out a spa experience they feel they can trust for high quality and value. Hotels/resorts can expect an increase in average daily rate (ADR), average length of stay, food & beverage revenues, as well as in the sale of other amenities offered by the property, if the leadership and staff understand how to utilize the draw of the spa to its consumers. Here are some simple guidelines to help you start and stay on the right track of spa profitability... Read on...

Peggy Borgman

Measuring employee productivity in the "stay" spa differs significantly from doing the same in the day spa environment. Day spas look hard at statistics such as client retention and retail ratios. Hotel spa employees work with a transient guest, who is, according to popular wisdom, less likely to return and less likely to buy. Or are they? Not all "stay" spas are the same. Understanding typical guest behavior can enable you to create realistic measurements of guest retention by spa employees. Read on...

Casey Olsen

Resort and Spa, Resort and Spa, a fitting end to a resorts name, however, what the American spa has morphed into may have now departed from what was the luxury spa experience. As with any functional item, when a boom occurs often the classical original gets diluted in the process. This article will travel back in time when the American spa was first conceived to what we now know as a resort or luxury spa facility and endeavor. Read on...

Peter Anderson

Today in most resorts the inclusion of a spa is no longer a luxury, but rather a standard amenity, expected and ubiquitous. Significant cross pollinating among the day, medical, amenity, and destination spas has created a competitive and comprehensive spa environment that here-to-fore that has never been experienced. This dynamic has created the phenomenon of Spa Wars, where product differentiation is subtle and the competitive edge can be paper thin. It is ironic that as the spa industry matures, distinctions between spa types are becoming blurred, resulting in subtle levels of segmentation and product differentiation that provide "options" to the savvy spa goer and "confusion" to the rest of us. Historically, hotel and resort spas have been classified as either "destination" or "amenity", meaning they were either the specific reason to travel to a remote location or they were and an added amenity (sometimes created as an after thought) for the an indulgent resort clientele. Read on...

Gayle Bulls Dixon

What awaits the ever-more-savvy spa connoisseur in 2006 and beyond? The number of spas in the U.S. has topped 12, 000, with spas offering a dizzying variety of services that address everything from weight loss to stress relief to skin revitalization and more. Looking ahead, we believe that spas will become more focused - rather than offering a little bit of everything, spa operators are going to specialize and become expert at the services they offer, whether it's Ayurveda or male specific treatments or whatever. With the number of spas only continuing to grow, spas are going to specialize and consolidate in order to survive. And diversify they will! Medical Spas, Retirement Spas, Man Spas - Oy Vey! Watch for these very interesting developments in the year(s) ahead. Read on...

Peggy Borgman

Do you consider your most popular services your most "profitable"? Just because you sell a lot of something doesn't make it profitable. Service profit is produced by careful control of your direct costs to produce that service. Profit is never just a happy accident in a spa business. Despite the seemingly lavish price tags for services in resort and hotel spas, our expenses and overhead are equally lavish. Spa directors must be constantly monitoring the actual expenses of producing their services, as well as looking for opportunities to simplify their menu and their operation, while adding value. Read on...

Jane Segerberg

Spas in resort and hotel properties are no longer an amenity that sets the property apart from its competitors - - spas are now a necessity and as a necessity, require more than build-it-and-they-will-will come planning. For the hotelier who is exploring the advantages of hiring a consultant or is already convinced that a spa consultant is a necessity for the project and wants to make a good choice, this article is intended to be helpful in understanding the role of the full service spa consultant and how to sort through the maize to find the right consulting firm for your property. Read on...

Jane Segerberg

Spas are a necessity for resorts and hotels. The Spa Business is experiencing an exponential growth rate. The number of Spa Goers is growing. Spas are hotel profit centers. Great statements! Great trends! What are the realities that these trends bring? The supply of spas has grown to the point that competition and consumer knowledge has changed the face of the industry. Now it is not just "a spa" that is necessary for a resort or hotel, it is a spa with an experience that is special for each guest along with service that is so seamless that the guest is not aware of it. No matter how spectacular the architectural features, or chic the interior design, or how creative the spa menu; if the experience and service delivery falls short, then guests do not recommend or return to the spa. Read on...

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Coming up in January 2018...

Mobile Technology: Relentless Innovation

Technology has become a crucial component in attracting and retaining hotel guests, and the need to enhance a guest’s technology experience is driving a relentless pace of innovation. To meet and exceed guest expectations, 54% of hotels will spend more on technology in 2018, and mobile solutions in particular will top the list of capital investments. Many hotels are integrating mobile booking, mobile keys, mobile payments and mobile check-in into their operations. Other hotels are emphasizing the in-room experience, boosting bandwidth and upgrading flat screen TVs to more easily interface with guest mobile devices. And though not yet mainstream, there are many exciting technology developments on the near horizon. The Internet of Things (loT) is taking form in some places, and can be found in guest room control systems, voice activation systems, and in wearable sensors that can be used for access and payment options. Virtual reality headsets are available at some hotels so guests can enjoy virtual trips to exotic locations or if off-property, preview conference facilities and guest rooms. How long will it be before a hotel employs a fleet of robots for room service, or utilizes a hologram as a concierge, or installs gesture-controlled walls that feature interactive digital displays? Some hotels are already using augmented reality for translation services, or interactive wall maps, or even virtual décor. This pace of innovation is challenging property owners and brands to stay on top of the latest technology trends while still addressing current projects. The January Hotel Business Review will explore what some hotels are doing to maximize their opportunities in the mobile technology space.