Library Archives

 
Mark  Grenoble

One of the big shifts in the spa and wellness movement that I have seen over the past few years is in the mindset of the spa-goer. What used to be a singular spa experience to relax the body, release tension in the muscles, and perhaps elevate one's physical appearance, has now transgressed into something deeper. The spa experience is beginning to look beyond the physical body and instead, engage the mind. Spa-goers are seeking transformation focused not on changing who you are, but creating a more perfect version of yourself. Read on...

Deborah   Smith

Widespread enthusiasm for a natural hot springs experience over the last ten years has growing numbers of wellness- and recreation-oriented consumers in America building their travel and vacation plans around these scenic destinations. Places where simple enjoyment of Mother Nature, outdoor recreation, and the pleasure of total relaxation are the main attractions. Wellness and recreation-based tourism centered around hot mineral springs is estimated to be a $50 billion global industry according to the Global Wellness Institute (GWI), a Miami-based think tank that has published several research reports concerning the global hot springs market in the past few years. Read on...

Trent  Munday

As I mentioned here once before, in an earlier article titled Demystifying the Hotel Spa , the hotel spa business has been a bit of a roller coaster ride over the past 20 years or so. Like all good roller coaster rides, the most exciting bit is when you start rolling down from the peak, zigging and zagging, twisting and turning, screaming with a mixture of delight, adrenalin and sheer terror – but that part of the ride is also what puts many people off. It's not for everyone. In many ways, the hotel spa business today is on that same exciting part of the business cycle. Read on...

Gaye Steinke

Most leisure travelers in the 21st century still expect the same things out of their vacations that they wanted in years gone by: beautiful sights, convenient comfort, and unique adventures. But there is a new travel trend on the rise. With an increasing focus on wellness in our every day lives, it was inevitable that travelers and meeting planners would want to incorporate healthy, mindful experiences into vacations and events. That means personalized spa treatments, location-specific yoga sessions, refreshing eco-tourism excursions, restorative detoxes and more. A wellness-focused getaway isn't just a vacation. It is about how a destination can change a person's body, mind and soul. Read on...

Michael Koethner

A collection of data, but not in the old-fashioned, very outdated and very boring numbers approach; rather with a compassionate view on how the industry will evolve, beyond the veil, in the very near future. Let's have a look at how to create a visionary, functional and operational double treatment room that is designed, professionally organized and set-up in such a manner as to fulfill the therapist's performance requirements and to accompany the demands of the new market, as well as the future guests' expectations. It will be crucial to include all aspects from the inside out. Read on...

Judith Jackson

Hotel amenities as a guest offering have become a vital source of attracting business and building a hotel brand. This is a relatively recent phenomenon that has grown in importance as guest's demand for good quality amenities has become universal. As I thought about writing this article I realized I should go to leaders in the hospitality field as well as draw upon my 15-year experience as the creator of a branded amenity line. Hunter Amenities of Canada and Susan Ricci, innovative former hotel managing director and current hotel and club consultant, became invaluable sources of information and comment from different points of view – which I think you will find as stimulating and helpful as I do. Read on...

Ann Brown

When I was in college, my door into the spa industry opened when someone reached out to help me. Spa therapy changed my entire health and wellbeing, and it continues to do so today. As much as I love the holistic wellness and altruistic side of the spa world, I very acutely recognize this is a business. In order to do well by your clients and impact their health and in order to support our therapists in their careers, our organizations must stay healthy and profitable. Licensed in massage, esthetics, and cosmetology and holding a business management degree, I'm grateful to have knowledge and insight from all sides of the spa. Read on...

David  Stoup

Authentic experiences and personal well-being have become increasingly important to the modern consumer, and hotels that provide an opportunity for travelers to maintain personal wellness not only engage their leisure visitors, but group guests and locals as well. As many hotel spa and fitness facilities are seriously underutilized, a new type of spa dedicated to wellness allows a hotel to capture the growing number of health-conscious consumers searching for travel experiences that adapt to their personal needs. When executed properly, a hotel can leverage its spa/wellness offerings to reach beyond the hotel stay, extending the guest experience post-visit to create long-term loyalty. Read on...

Keith  Simmel

Over the last decade, we have seen the nation take a greater interest in health and wellness. There has been a major paradigm shift calling for higher quality, organic products and transparency with ingredients. In fact, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) now requires restaurants, retail food establishments and vending machines to list the amount of calories associated with each item. Organic grocers like Whole Foods are leading the market with their superior offerings. It's no surprise that this consumer trend has also manifested in the hospitality industry where hotel designers, owners and developers are seeing greater demand for health and wellness products than ever before. Read on...

Camille Hoheb

A hotel's vitality hinges on the guest experience. Out of all the business trends, none is more powerful than the growing wellness movement. Wellness is everywhere. This is especially true in tourism, with healthy amenities at airports, airlines and lodging. Healthy hotel brands are leading the way and other properties are following suite. Hotels deliver healthy options related to physical, emotional, intellectual, spiritual, environmental and social wellbeing. Read on...

Melinda Minton

Millennials are counteracting their fight to have more free time with upping their productivity. They crave the spa because they put their well-being before work. Other demographics are also working to live rather than living to work. With that sentiment business travelers are adding on to their working business trips by adding family or significant others to the trip. Spa and wellness programs work wonderfully in the sense that they add creative fitness, healthy cooking, meditation, team and couples focused activity to the sometimes hum-drum qualities of a hotel stay. Furthermore, as a property slated to handle a company's business travel and leisure expenditure is a profitability bonus that makes numbers sing the praises of bleisure. Read on...

Laszlo Puczko

It may seem to be relatively straight forward to talk about accountability and investment in spas or wellness centers. Reality however proves otherwise. Interestingly, the industry has not yet accepted a definition for spa, or for wellness centers (or different types of spas). According to the International SPA Association "Spas are places devoted to overall well-being through a variety of professional services that encourage the renewal of mind, body and spirit." Although ISPA's relevant terminologies are often referred to, these are not global definitions. Still, at least there are some descriptions available for spas. Wellness centers represent an even less clear arena. Read on...

Cassie Hernandez

Twenty years ago, the U.S. spa industry was just beginning to blossom. There were approximately 3, 000 spa locations then, compared to nearly 44, 000-plus locations today. Day spas were popping up on every corner, driven largely by the full-service salon. Hotel and resort spas were few and far between, and destination spas such as the Golden Door and Canyon Ranch were luxurious getaways for the lucky few. Spas were a luxury, only reserved for the wealthy or affluent adult. Now, I have seen my youngest spa patron at the ripe age of 4 years old. Read on...

Judith Jackson

Who is the first person your guest has a conversation with as they arrive and enter? Is it the doorman, parking valet, front desk associate, or bell person? By the time your guest enters the hotel, one or more members of your staff have already effectively communicated your property's number of stars -- official or not. This messaging is telegraphed through the owner or operator's philosophy of management and training, and it goes well beyond any off-the-shelf or even custom training program or protocol. It requires a good dose of soul. Read on...

Jacqueline Clarke

French Thermal Spas can inspire modern wellness and spa industries worldwide. They are turning around an industry that was in terminal decline. Their vision is of "a new thermalism" that will develop thermal solutions to solve the public health problems of today. The mega health problems they target include ageing-related conditions, addictions, allergies, stress, obesity related, and effective, but non-medicated, solutions for common pains. The new thermalism expands its appeal by diversifying from the rigidly therapeutic offer into the more flexible "thermoludic" (thermal and leisure). A major research project is generating the evidence to convince consumers and insurers. Read on...

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Coming up in January 2018...

Mobile Technology: Relentless Innovation

Technology has become a crucial component in attracting and retaining hotel guests, and the need to enhance a guest’s technology experience is driving a relentless pace of innovation. To meet and exceed guest expectations, 54% of hotels will spend more on technology in 2018, and mobile solutions in particular will top the list of capital investments. Many hotels are integrating mobile booking, mobile keys, mobile payments and mobile check-in into their operations. Other hotels are emphasizing the in-room experience, boosting bandwidth and upgrading flat screen TVs to more easily interface with guest mobile devices. And though not yet mainstream, there are many exciting technology developments on the near horizon. The Internet of Things (loT) is taking form in some places, and can be found in guest room control systems, voice activation systems, and in wearable sensors that can be used for access and payment options. Virtual reality headsets are available at some hotels so guests can enjoy virtual trips to exotic locations or if off-property, preview conference facilities and guest rooms. How long will it be before a hotel employs a fleet of robots for room service, or utilizes a hologram as a concierge, or installs gesture-controlled walls that feature interactive digital displays? Some hotels are already using augmented reality for translation services, or interactive wall maps, or even virtual décor. This pace of innovation is challenging property owners and brands to stay on top of the latest technology trends while still addressing current projects. The January Hotel Business Review will explore what some hotels are doing to maximize their opportunities in the mobile technology space.