Library Archives

 
Mark  Grenoble

One of the big shifts I've seen in resort spas is the evolution of the dining experience. Spa food used to have the connotation of deprivation, a limited regime devoid of one's favorite things. Today, it's no longer bland food but a flavorful, healthy cuisine that many guests want to indulge in. We call it "intelligent cuisine" and it's not just about great-tasting, soul-satisfying food that's good for you, it's also about the provenance of the food: where it comes from, who produces it, and how it impacts the planet, our bodies and our sense of wellbeing. Read on...

Anne McCall Wilson

Everywhere, technology is inserting itself into the high touch world of spas and wellness. How do spas manage the world of digital, mobile, wearables, social, analytics, CRM, anti-gravity machines, gamification, or uberization and still achieve the sorely needed healing effects of human touch and personal connection? Spa leaders or wellness practitioners and hotel technology experts or digital specialists don't often live in the same realm but increasingly guests are pushing them to collaborate. Read on...

Victor Bennett

According to the US Census, in 2015 there are 92 million millennials in the marketplace. They range from 18-35 years-old and are presently the largest demographic age group,. Jen Usery of the Worthgroup, a leading hospitality architect and design firm, conveys that millennials are expected to represent 50 percent of all travelers in 2015 - 50 percent! . The travel industry predicts that millennials will incrementally out spend any other age group on travel services in the next 12 months. Millennials' fervor for wellness, search for novel experiences, and social media and technology, are driving hotels to create new brands or to tweak existing culture to address the unique needs of this age group. Hotel spas are strategically positioned to provide just what the millennials are looking for. When they focus on wellness, address the potential and pitfalls of a lifestyle of saturated technology, and create customized spa experiences, it can increase ROI, guest experiences and satisfaction. Read on...

Leslie  Wolski

Embarking on a vacation is always such an exciting time. We enjoy seeing new places, meeting new people, experiencing different cultures and eating exotic foods. However, we also have to lug our over-packed bags, negotiate the maze that is airport security, flag down taxis and navigate our way around new cities. We go on vacation to escape the stress of work, social obligations and the demands of day to day life, but unfortunately many times we simply add to the aggravation. It is no wonder that in the most recent Spafinder survey 85 percent of travelers responded that they return from vacation feeling less rejuvenated than when they left. Read on...

Maggy Dunphy

Spending time in nature is the best remedy to improve your quality and outlook on life. It also provides the simplest, most cost effective and innovative opportunities to have a positive impact on our overall well-being. Global Wellness Tourism is a $3.4 trillion business as reported by the 2013 Global Wellness Report. Dr. Deepak Chopra noted in a recent speech that, "Wellness is the number one trend in the world today." And Ophelia Yeung, senior consultant, Center for Science, Technology & Economic Development, SRI, and one of the report's lead researchers, argued that she only sees more growth ahead: "Prevention-challenged traditional healthcare systems, and an obesity and chronic disease crisis, are simply costing people and governments too much. Read on...

Jay Heidenreich

Authenticity and unique experiences continue to be important criteria to most travelers when making travel destination decisions. Along with this trend, we've seen guests also looking to maintain healthy lifestyles while on vacation. As the focus on holistic wellness and authentic travel experiences continues to grow, it is important that we as hoteliers keep these ideas front of mind as we develop new concepts for our hotel offerings. Infusing authenticity, health and wellness into all aspects of a hotel from spa to food and beverage and guest activities, is something we are very dedicated to at The Ritz-Carlton, Kapalua. We are consistently planning and evaluating our hotel amenities to ensure that our guests have the opportunity to create lasting memories through unique experiences they would not be able to find elsewhere. Read on...

Trent  Munday

Professor Gerard Bodeker has said that spas are the ‘organizational face of Wellness'. What he means by this is that spas provide a safe and understandable entry point into the diverse and often confusing world of Wellness. Much like a hospital is the organizational face of illness. Patients rarely know which medical specialist is the most appropriate for their specific condition. They trust that the hospital will direct them to right doctor. Spas, according to Bodeker, offer the same for Wellness. Read on...

Ann Brown

The spa industry is constantly changing. Keeping up with evolving client mindsets, and of course, trends in the marketplace can be a challenge for any business. And to top it off hotel spas have to be flexible enough to incorporate changes into every part of the business - hospitality, spa and fitness, dining - it all has to come together perfectly to make guests have an experience that will make them come back. Whether you are a hotel spa or day spa, implementing new products and services, while still maintaining the level of service guests have come to expect is key to success. Read on...

Mia Kyricos

Remember back in the day when the possibility of a hotel with a pool was enough to get customers excited about a pending stay? Fitness centers became the next "it" thing, followed by spas, which often began as "after thoughts," thanks to a little extra basement space left on the construction drawings. Then for those hoteliers savvy enough to understand the appeal, spas were marketed as amenities, begrudgingly accepted as cost centers and widely misunderstood operationally. But guests sure did enjoy a good massage. My, have things changed. Or have they? Read on...

Tracey Anne Latkovic

Wellness is seemingly everywhere. Our shampoo comes from the corner of healthy and happy; our workstations allow for standing, sitting, and walking; fast food joints are now in the healthy choices game; and even our margaritas' are skinny. The proliferation of health and wellness opportunities that have been thrust into our lives in the last few years have most of us wondering which end is up. Remember the 90's? The low-fat, no fat, low-calorie, no calorie craze had our heads spinning and guess what? We ended up fatter than ever. We need to look beyond the hype to discover what's best for our well-being. Read on...

Michael Koethner

In the past few years, there has been an ever-growing, very subtle feeling of insecurity, instability, craziness up to some point of panic, when it comes to people's daily life, personal growth and the overall economic growth. This feeling has forced humanity and societies to do things that have separated everyone and everything on a large scale with some very unpleasant outcomes. However, in the past 10 plus years this feeling has turned to the other side of the coin with an even deeper sense of urgency surfacing in each of us, to find out what this is all about, supported by a force that is seemingly coming from nowhere. This deep-seated feeling of unrest has been on the rise since the mid 40's, and pushed aside ever since to avoid confrontation of a possible ugly truth, the truth that the life lived up until today was an illusion. Read on...

Andrew Cohan

If we step back and review what the term "wellness" means to business or leisure travelers, we will see that many "wellness" activities involve little to no investment on the part of a hotel, in order to accommodate guests' interest. Whether the guest is a boomer or millennial, interested in philanthropic giving forward or taking care of oneself with spiritual or physical aids to the body, mind and spirit - it is only with a bit of creativity that a hotel's programming can be developed to improve its "wellness profile" with minimal cost. Read on...

Peter McAlpine

The time will come when Corporate Offices have to accept that the SOP-Customer Satisfaction guest experience concept is obsolete, however much technology they embellish it with. The energetic guest experience will replace it because it fulfills the unspoken emotional needs and wishes of guests. Corporate Offices will inevitably reject or resist such a change, and because of this the hotel industry landscape will change radically in the future. The future belongs to independent hotels and small hotel groups, which ignore the Sirens of Tradition, and which create an energetic guest experience, Heart-Based Hospitality, which has no limits. Read on...

Michael Koethner

In the past 20 or more years, the striving for an attainable and visible goal, or a successful career, as we know it, has been in decline. Humanity is on the verge of a huge awakening and psychological advancement. As result of this paradigm shift there is great change of the traditional work environment and fundamental adjustments on the economic landscape. This shift has affected the lives of millions of people, families and companies around the world. More and more people ask themselves why they should do what they currently do and what would the benefit of their doing be if the products they produced and the service they have offered will be no longer useful, applicable or required, by tomorrow. For most people this circumstance conditional change has become a struggle for identity. Read on...

Bonnie Knutson

I read somewhere that anyone can tell you to exercise more. But matching it to travelers' lifestyles and making it fun forever is hard. That is both the challenge and opportunity for every hotel everywhere in 2014 and beyond. We all want to live longer and better. And with rising health care costs, more of the responsibility to do so falls on our individual shoulders. That's why the media, the government, and business are admonishing us to eat healthier and exercise more. Hotels can be an integral partner in helping their guests maintain fitness as part of their traveling lifestyle. In this article, you'll read about five fabulous fitness trends for your hotel which I call the Fab Fitness Five. Read on...

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Coming up in February 2018...

Social Media: Engagement is Key

There are currently 2.3 billion active users of social media networks and savvy hotel operators have incorporated social media into their marketing mix. There are a few Goliath channels on which one must have a presence (Facebook & Twitter) but there are also several newer upstart channels (Instagram, Snapchat &WeChat, for example) that merit consideration. With its 1.86 billion users, Facebook is a dominant platform where operators can drive brand awareness, facilitate bookings, offer incentives and collect sought-after reviews. Twitter's 284 million users generate 500 million tweets per day, and operators can use its platform for lead generation, building loyalty, and guest interaction. Instagram was originally a small photo-sharing site but it has blown up into a massive photo and video channel. The site can be used to post photos of the hotel property, as well as creating Instagram Stories - personal videos that disappear from the channel after 24 hours. In this regard, Instagram and Snapchat are now in direct competition. WeChat is a Chinese company whose aim is to be the App for Everything - instant messaging, social media, shopping and payment services - all in a single platform. In addition to these channels, blogging continues to be a popular method to establish leadership, enhance reputations, and engage with customers in a direct and personal way. The key to effective use of all social media is to find out where your customers are and then, to the fullest extent possible, engage with them on a personal level. This engagement is what creates a personal connection and sustains brand loyalty. The February Hotel Business Review will explore these issues and examine how some hotels are successfully integrating social media into their operations.