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Nicki Noble Bean

The Nonantum Resort is located right on the water in Kennebunkport, Maine – just a half mile from Dock Square, and an easy scenic stroll or bike ride up Ocean Avenue to Walker's Point, summer home of the Bushes. Situated on the Kennebunk River, with the breakwater and the ocean within view, the resort has its own lighthouse and an array of classic Adirondack chairs set out on its spacious back lawn – making it an idyllic coastal retreat. Built in 1883 by a local sea captain, and opened on July 4, 1884, the Nonantum kicks off its 132nd season of operation Read on...

Patricia  Griffin

I attended the "Re-Think Waste" Massachusetts recycling meeting, and was absolutely blown away by a session on textile recycling. I'm sharing with you what I learned, and hope you too will consider making textile recycling as important as we all make paper, aluminum, plastic and glass recycling. Fleece, flannel, corduroy, cotton, nylon, denim, wool and linen. What can you do with these fibers when you're finished wearing them, sleeping on them or draping them over your windows? One way to benefit both your community and the environment is to donate used textiles to charitable organizations. Most recovered household textiles end up at these organizations. Read on...

Jennifer Moon

While there are still US Senators who insist climate change is a hoax , the planet is less patient when it comes to winning or losing that argument. The effects on the ecosystem of human-driven activity to date are being felt now and will only intensify in the coming years. There's an increasing amount of media coverage around climate change topics that all emphasize a sense of urgency and near doomsday-like outlooks for many industries and destinations: warmest winters ever experienced, faster rising sea levels, and global food insecurity. In the private sector, we find the rhetoric is shifting towards strategically addressing climate change issues. Read on...

Bob Cerrone

Water was once considered an endless resource in the U.S. As a commodity, it appeared to be both plentiful and inexpensive. But due to the lasting effects of climate change, parts of the country are experiencing higher temperatures and less rainfall, preventing fresh water reservoirs and basins from keeping up with the demand of personal and agricultural use.The state of California is in its fifth year of a devastating drought, it won't be the only state to experience strained supply in the near future. It's everyone's responsibility, including hotel owners, to help combat the dwindling water supply before every state reaches critically low resources. Read on...

Faith Taylor

Good business is about seeking out opportunities to create value. As our social, economic and environmental landscapes continue to change, we need approaches to adapt and evolve our business practices in order to manage risk and create market value in new ways. Increasingly, consumers are looking for companies that are socially responsible, and ones which understand that there is a need to give back to their communities. In addition, there is an increase in the focus and attention to sustainable operating practices from investors, guests, partners, and employees. People are looking to do business with companies that understand their global footprint Read on...

Lawrence Adams

Major hotel companies realize the enormous benefits that come with environmental and socially sustainable practices. In addition to increasing profits from energy and water conservation, hotels are boosting profits due to an expanding segment of environmentally-concerned travelers and corporations, who make lodging choices based on hotels' green credentials. As they embrace environmental and social sustainability, many of the major hotel companies have mission statements expounding on their environmental stewardship. In this article, we will look at five major hospitality companies and their approaches, practices and policies in achieving sustainable goals for their hotels and resorts. Read on...

Taryn Holowka

Think back to the last time you stayed in a hotel. Did you notice anything that seemed eco-friendly – maybe there were recycling bins located throughout the hotel, perhaps there was a towel reuse program or maybe you even saw solar panels on the roof? Fortunately, these scenarios are becoming more and more common as hotels and resorts are catching on to and embracing sustainability practices – practices that are not only in demand from their customers, but that are also reducing operating costs significantly. Read on...

Jan Peter Bergkvist

Businesses, including the hospitality sector, often argue that there's no customer demand for sustainability, so they do not focus on grabbing opportunities to work strategically towards becoming part of the solution. Very few innovations have come from customer demand - on the contrary, innovation and the success that follows, is often thanks to daring leaders, those who can foresee the development of society and really take the lead; in short leaders who show leadership! Read on...

Ranee Ruble-Dotts

California's unprecedented drought led to government mandates in 2015 requiring water agencies to cut residential and business water usage by 25 percent. For hotels, the mandates also include specific rules about irrigation, serving water only upon request, and encouraging reuse of guests' towels and linens. While the mandates represent a starting point for water conservation, many California hotels are already ahead of the game: finding ways to reduce water consumption without compromising the guests' experience. They have produced a steady stream of water-saving ideas for hotel bathrooms, laundry, landscaping, and kitchens--all of which are transferable to hotels almost anywhere. Read on...

Kjell Mitchell

Glenwood Hot Springs has been an environmental trailblazer since long before terms like "carbon footprint, " "eco-friendly" and "sustainability" became commonplace. It actively harnesses the geothermal energy of the mineral hot springs for snowmelt and to heat domestic water supplies. The Glenwood Hot Springs Lodge was recognized with a TripAdvisor "Green Leaders" award in 2013 for its environmental practices. In addition to harnessing geothermal heat sources on-site, Glenwood Hot Springs has also adopted practices that include the use of state-of-the-art materials and energy-efficient technology that add up to not only dollars saved, but to a cleaner, healthier environment for visitors and the community. Read on...

Joseph Ricci

The four-year drought in the western United States has caused businesses and the public to find new and innovate ways to conserve and reuse water. And despite the promise of eased drought conditions this winter, recent reports from California have the state's snowpack at below-average levels, prompting state officials to call for additional and more restrictive water conservation efforts – a trend likely to be mirrored elsewhere. As a major consumer of water within the American business landscape, the hotel industry is both a large water user and a leading voice in the water conservation movement. In this article we'll explore major steps taken by industry leaders as well as trends shaping the future of hotel water usage and conservation. Read on...

Ken Hutcheson

As temperatures start to warm up and thawing begins, many hoteliers across the country are thrilled to say goodbye to winter. In some regions, particularly in the Northeast and Midwest, this winter proved to be a hotelier's worst nightmare. With above freezing temperatures and blizzard-like conditions, it was difficult for some guests to even travel to their destinations. Keeping entranceways, parking lots and sidewalks clean and safe was another challenge many hotel owners and managers faced this winter. Now that winter has officially come to an end, it's time to prepare your landscapes for spring. Read on...

Heather  Kolakowski

Environmental sustainability and the desire to reduce the amount of food wasted are top trends in today's society. It has been reported that approximately one-third of hotel users consider the "green-ness" of potential service providers when making their purchasing decisions. Composting is one example of the types of "green" practices that customers such as these resonate with and when implemented into its operations can help to enhance the customers' perceptions of the organization. The following will detail the benefits and challenges of composting and composting programs as well as provide guidance on how to implement one into your operation. Read on...

Rauni Kew

The transition from gas powered, combustion engine cars to electric vehicles (EV's), and even hybrids, has been relatively slow. However, later this year, new models with lower price tags, sleeker styling and improved batteries with more range are expected. Couple EV improvements and expanding infra structure with looming emissions regulation, the transition from combustion engine to EV is positioned to accelerate in the near future. Read on...

Kevin Thomas Carter

Guests want to know how they're contributing to sustainability, especially if it's already part of their lifestyle. Keeping guests informed about sustainable operations makes them feel involved in the efforts your property is making to have a low negative impact on the environment. Signage, tours of facilities, and online education encourage sustainable behaviors and help guests understand their contributions to your environmental mission. When guests are involved in your environmental efforts, they are better able to contribute to energy and fuel savings by turning off lights and regulating the thermostat, thus increasing your sustainability success. Read on...

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Coming up in January 2018...

Mobile Technology: Relentless Innovation

Technology has become a crucial component in attracting and retaining hotel guests, and the need to enhance a guest’s technology experience is driving a relentless pace of innovation. To meet and exceed guest expectations, 54% of hotels will spend more on technology in 2018, and mobile solutions in particular will top the list of capital investments. Many hotels are integrating mobile booking, mobile keys, mobile payments and mobile check-in into their operations. Other hotels are emphasizing the in-room experience, boosting bandwidth and upgrading flat screen TVs to more easily interface with guest mobile devices. And though not yet mainstream, there are many exciting technology developments on the near horizon. The Internet of Things (loT) is taking form in some places, and can be found in guest room control systems, voice activation systems, and in wearable sensors that can be used for access and payment options. Virtual reality headsets are available at some hotels so guests can enjoy virtual trips to exotic locations or if off-property, preview conference facilities and guest rooms. How long will it be before a hotel employs a fleet of robots for room service, or utilizes a hologram as a concierge, or installs gesture-controlled walls that feature interactive digital displays? Some hotels are already using augmented reality for translation services, or interactive wall maps, or even virtual décor. This pace of innovation is challenging property owners and brands to stay on top of the latest technology trends while still addressing current projects. The January Hotel Business Review will explore what some hotels are doing to maximize their opportunities in the mobile technology space.