Library Archives

 
Pat Miller

Even the most luxurious hotel has a finite budget when it comes to the design or re-design of hotel spaces. The best designers prioritize expenses that have the biggest impact on guest perceptions, while minimizing or eliminating those that don't. This story will focus on three blockbuster areas – the entry experience, the guest room, and the public spaces. This article will focus on these three key areas and shed light on how the decision making process and design choices made with care and attention can create memorable, luxe experiences without breaking the bank. Read on...

Eric Rahe

The advent of social media brought with it an important shift in the hospitality industry. Any guest's experience might be amplified to thousands of potential customers, and you want to be sure that your hotel stands out for the right reasons. Furthermore, technology has increased competition. According to Euromonitor International, the travel industry will have the highest online payment percentage of any industry by 2020, often occurring through third-party sites that display your competitors alongside you. As a result, many hoteliers are looking to stand out by engaging customers and the experience has become more interactive than ever. Read on...

Anthony DiGuiseppe

Architecture is the built environment that defines space and affects the way people live, whether you are a modernist or a traditionalist. Wellness is a state of health and mindfulness that not only brings each of us in tune with nature, both our bodies and minds but also gives us a spiritual attitude towards one another on a global basis. Is it possible to combine the two, Wellness and Architecture? There are many examples of how this attitude of wellness in building has started to take form. Let's take a look at how this movement is evolving and the opportunities it brings to the hotel industry. Read on...

Eric Henry

There are many possibilities for adding interactive and conventional digital signage around hotel properties, and lots of examples in the marketplace of high impact, meaningful deployments. But there are also countless examples of hotels that have invested in display technology without having objectives defined, a strategy for execution, and an understanding of how success is measured and validated. I see hotels with screens and wonder why the operators bothered. But more often these days, I see smart operators using that technology to enhance the properties, and the experiences of their guests. In this article we'll take a look at some exciting new technologies available to hotels today. Read on...

Ed Wilms

It might not always be easy to adapt a brand's standards to a downtown property, but no matter where one is designing, the main priority should always be helping clients identify their target audience and how to make their return on investments by creating the proper offerings for their location. Research is your friend here, which can come in the form of multiple charrettes with partner offices and the client or neighborhood residents. It will always lead to a deeper knowledge of the community you are entering and the ability to link the history of the site with the new property you present to it. Read on...

Monika Moser

With new trends dominating upcoming hotel renovations and redefining brands, it is interesting to compare the point of view of designers and hoteliers. The importance of combining operational knowledge as soon as design work starts seems to be obvious, yet very few projects combine both backgrounds. Designers, for the most part, have ample experience in hotel design but none in operations, while hoteliers do not always embrace the full possibilities of good hotel design. We explore the importance of operations and design collaborating in the early stages of a renovation and examine some new trends from both a design and operations perspective. Read on...

Amanda Hertzler

Millennials and technological innovation are leading some of the most substantial transformations in American hotels since the business-centric 1970s. The next generation of urban hotels resemble the minimalist European model where limited amenity hotels are connected to high-amenity neighborhoods. Stripping hotels of their traditional amenities, the design of spaces becomes crucial. Architecture and design are to be used to support guests in their total hotel experience. What do these hotels look like? If the country's newest hotel brands are any indication, they will be historically rich, locally relevant, minimalist, full of multi-use space, interactive, and community- and wellness-oriented. Let's take a look … Read on...

T. Dupree Scovell

Woodbine Development Corporation designed, developed and opened the Hyatt Regency Hill Country Resort and Spa in San Antonio in 1992, the year of MTV VJs and Arsenio Hall. At the time, my father was calling the signals and this was the first of five similar resorts throughout the Southwest that Woodbine was responsible for developing over a period of about 15 years. The formula was pretty consistent: 300+ acres, 500 guest rooms, 100, 000 square feet of meeting space (or more), two or three golf courses, a water park and a few resort mascots, which have included dogs, longhorns, hawks and spray-less skunks (don't ask). Read on...

Reto Brader

For most of us, the process of checking into a hotel is not particularly memorable. Nor do many of us often recollect how hotels engaged our sense beyond standard guest relations. Technology has come a long way in filling this void, and hotels have made significant strides in how they engage visitors. From a purely audio-visual perspective, video – i.e., digital signage – tends to get the most attention as a branding, engagement and monetization tool. However, used appropriately, audio can deliver the same benefits in hospitality environments in hotels and resorts, and at a far lower investment point that deploying and operating a digital signage network – particularly when working across multiple sites. Read on...

Tammy S. Miller

There is a generation of young people that have redefined travel for all of us. Actually, they have redefined many things for all of us! The advent of social media platforms and the influx of visually stimulating photos posted everywhere have enabled people to open their minds to new ideas. Where the unknown used to be scary, there is very little unknown these days because you can tap into new experiences from friends and strangers gaining comfort in your interests. You can follow innovators and be exposed to what others are seeing and what they are experiencing and put those ideas on your bucket list. Read on...

David Ashen

The shift in calling a public area an art gallery first and a function space (pre-function) second was interesting to note. That's because, particularly during the last 10 years, art has become a necessary part of the story for all upper-end, boutique hotels. This is especially true in the United States, where there is scant opportunity for the display of notable, public art. Thankfully, hotels have been filling that niche, bringing excellent art to the general public and making it accessible. Now, quality art is not a nicety; it's an expectation. Read on...

David Ashen

There was a time in America, before the proliferation of national chains, when every town had an independent, family-run hotel. With the rise of soft-branded properties and increasing demand for guest stays in properties reflective of local culture, David Ashen, partner and founder of interior design and brand consulting firm dash design, takes a look at the rising popularity of independently, locally branded properties and their how they—and the hospitality industry—are meeting the desire for venues with local color. Read on...

James Coleman

You have probably read the reasons why you should update your hotel's bathrooms. And you're now certain that your bathrooms should be upgraded to save space, please your customers, and give more aesthetic appeal to your hotel. However, choosing to upgrade your bathroom isn't as simple as calling your interior designer and telling them to overhaul everything in your bathroom and hoping for the best. After all, a complete upgrade for the sake of aesthetic might only waste your money when done improperly. You might also end up changing something and displeasing your customers, especially if you don't know what they want Read on...

Gino Caliendo

Embarking on a major hotel renovation can be an exciting endeavor. When we began formulating our renewed vision for the Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront in 2014, we were mindful of a dual responsibility: projecting the image of the regency brand while also infusing into the plan the personality and flavor of a unique surrounding region and its people. Now that the project is complete, others in the industry may benefit from learning about how we achieved those objectives. In all, the year-long renovation included a floor-to-ceiling overhaul of all 951 guest rooms, corridors, the roof-top fitness center, select meeting spaces and more. Read on...

David Ashen

In the U.S. more than one-third of the workforce has worked remotely. No surprise there. If you haven't or don't sometimes telecommute, chances are that someone you know has or does, at least occasionally. Gallup, which shared the 2015 statistic that 37 percent of workers in the nation have worked off-site—that up markedly from the 9 percent that did so in 1995—also found that the average worker telecommutes twice a month, with 46 percent of remote workers doing so during regular work hours. It's no wonder. Mobile technology has opened the way for on-the-go business owners, executives and others to work remotely while keeping connected with colleagues and clients. Yet, working solo has its limits. Read on...

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Coming up in January 2018...

Mobile Technology: Relentless Innovation

Technology has become a crucial component in attracting and retaining hotel guests, and the need to enhance a guest’s technology experience is driving a relentless pace of innovation. To meet and exceed guest expectations, 54% of hotels will spend more on technology in 2018, and mobile solutions in particular will top the list of capital investments. Many hotels are integrating mobile booking, mobile keys, mobile payments and mobile check-in into their operations. Other hotels are emphasizing the in-room experience, boosting bandwidth and upgrading flat screen TVs to more easily interface with guest mobile devices. And though not yet mainstream, there are many exciting technology developments on the near horizon. The Internet of Things (loT) is taking form in some places, and can be found in guest room control systems, voice activation systems, and in wearable sensors that can be used for access and payment options. Virtual reality headsets are available at some hotels so guests can enjoy virtual trips to exotic locations or if off-property, preview conference facilities and guest rooms. How long will it be before a hotel employs a fleet of robots for room service, or utilizes a hologram as a concierge, or installs gesture-controlled walls that feature interactive digital displays? Some hotels are already using augmented reality for translation services, or interactive wall maps, or even virtual décor. This pace of innovation is challenging property owners and brands to stay on top of the latest technology trends while still addressing current projects. The January Hotel Business Review will explore what some hotels are doing to maximize their opportunities in the mobile technology space.