Library Archives

 
Hans Van Wees

While home-sharing companies capture attention for truly immersive local experiences, and brands respond to the movement with sub-brands touting authenticity, independent hoteliers have long appreciated the localized approach to business. In Burlington, Vermont, such local partnerships build and bond communities, and through their contribution to the hotel design, product and programming, ultimately enhance the overall guest experience. The current state of the travel industry suggests the sharing economy is here to stay. These home-sharing companies are rapidly increasing in popularity as travelers crave – and ultimately, trust – their hosts to serve as sources of information for where locals really go to eat, explore, shop, etc. Read on...

Michael Suomi

The hospitality market has seen an explosion in the number of Soft Brands in recent years, and yet the concept is not at all new. How then do we account for the sudden resurgence and success of this decades-old model? A new generation of soft brands emerging today coincides with a major shift in the demands and desires of travelers: one that places an unprecedented premium on authenticity and originality. No longer motivated by standardized offers wherever they go around the world, travelers want to be immersed in their destinations, and favor excitement of discovery over the tried-and-true comfort of familiarity. Read on...

Dave Murphy

With improvements in the economy bringing more and more disposable income into the household, many people are spending money on experiences and travel, causing a boom for the restaurant and hospitality industries. The elevated occupancy and bookings for hotels and inns is leading to a surplus of revenue that many owners and managers are using to re-invest in their properties. Many hotels have not seen renovations or remodels since before the housing market up-ended in 2008. As a result too often the interior spaces are dated. Improving décor throughout the property is one vital element to ensuring customer satisfaction and retention. Read on...

Erin Hoover

Until mid-20th century, a hotel's aesthetic was unique and customized to each location – either by design, as in the case of luxury properties built at the beginning of the 20th century, like the Waldorf Astoria or St. Regis, or by default, in the case of humbler regional hotels, motels and inns. The trend toward design standardization started in the 1950s in North America. Middle class prosperity mixed with modern interstate highways and cars designed for longer trips fueled an increase in leisure and business travel. But to offset the boundaries being pushed in personal exploration, travelers desired predictability in lodging. Read on...

Pat McBride

The mission of hotels has evolved over the years, from simply providing guests with a comfortable, safe place to sleep to offering a destination that provides much more than shelter. At today's hotels and resorts, visitors have a place to conduct business, enjoy good food and drink, socialize and escape from life's everyday pressures. But travelers often seek something more now, and a new trend has distinctly emerged. Many visitors no longer want to escape. They want to explore and dive into the local atmosphere. Today's travelers desire to experience the culture, attractions, food and neighborhoods of a destination more than ever before. Read on...

Jesse MacDougall

In the last two decades, the boutique hotel revolution has stolen the show and has birthed an abundance of small batch hospitality concepts that have scaled out and fundamentally changed the way hotels look and behave. The Kimptons and W's have blazed the trail for FB&E hotels like the Ace and the Standard. European darlings like Citizen M have dared to dream small by making micro-rooms sexy with unapologetic modernism and vibrant, public spaces. Outliers, like the 21c Museum Hotels, exemplify the sort of programmatic innovation that begs the question – are hotels just hotels anymore? Read on...

Bob Verrier

Back in 2001, Saunders Hotel Group, LLC (SHG) and Irish hotel group Jurys Doyle commissioned The Architectural Team, Inc. (TAT) to design a luxury hotel project in Boston – but it wasn't to be a tall, glassy tower. Rather, our task was to renovate, restore, and update a classic structure that had been a part of the city's fabric for nearly a century: the former Boston Police Department headquarters. Located in the historic and trendy Back Bay neighborhood, this beautiful seven-story Italian Renaissance Revival building rendered in limestone dates back to 1925. Read on...

Scott Acton

Millennials have become the fastest growing consumer segment in the hospitality industry. Therefore, changes in quality and experiences provided in hotels across the nation are essential in ensuring greater competitiveness and overall success. Millennials, who are heavily reliant on technology and seek non-traditional features in services provided, are looking for a different approach to hospitality; with immersive lifestyle experiences their main priority, resulting in a rising demand for special visual imagery and more comprehensive sensual engagement. Accordingly, it is necessary for the hospitality industry to adjust to this new trend in consumer preferences, demanding that hotels put substantial effort into creating a new environment, appealing to consumers' five senses. Read on...

Paula J. Azevedo

Think of a hotel brand, and it's a sure bet that far more than its logo will come to mind. From the initial booking of a room, to interactions with the valet, bellhop and reception desk staff, to the overnight room's comfort plus amenities, and right through to the check-out process, hotel brands are banking on providing an enhanced guest experience, overall. Certainly, the design of a hotel matters to its brand, but design alone cannot sustain a brand. It can, however, elevate the experience from start to finish. Read on...

Beth Brett

Looking ahead to 2016 travel, there's a new player on Palm Springs ever-growing hospitality scene. Uniquely positioned to further revitalize South Palm Springs, the desert's newest hotel offering, V Palm Springs Hotel opens its doors this March, just in time for some of the nation's top festivals, including Coachella and Stagecoach. Managed by Filament Hospitality a full-service management company and owned by celebrity lawyers, Mark Geragos and Brian Kabateck, V Palm Springs promises to redefine the desert experience. Thanks to Len Cotsovolos, Director of Interior Design for WESTAR Architectural Group, their vision will be fully realized when 140-room hotel opens its doors this March. Read on...

Patrick Burke

Encompassing over 3.5 million square feet with a price tag of $4.4 billion, Resorts World Sentosa is one of the world's largest multi-recreational luxury parks. A city-within-a-city, the resort features six hotels, offering a total of 1, 840 rooms; a large casino; a convention center, including a 7, 000-square-meter ballroom, conference and meeting facilities; a multitude of theaters and entertainment facilities; a maritime museum, a large marine animal park and water park; a world-class spa and extensive retail stores and restaurants. Anchored by Universal Studios Singapore, the project required a design approach that would celebrate the unique site in a very special way. Read on...

Larry  Mogelonsky

Once a hotel is build, it is especially difficult to modify the exterior structure in order to improve a guest's first impression of the property. However, by borrowing curb appeal tactics used by realtors, there are smaller, incremental upgrades that a hotelier can undertake to heighten one's appreciation of the hotel before they even set foot inside. These range from small material changes to the structure and lighting to the inclusion of outdoor art, plants and water. As well, the demand for exterior third places is also a viable option. Read on...

Paula J. Azevedo

The Miami of today - the "It" city of art, tourism, fashion, culture and business - was really born over a decade ago, when Samuel Keller, the former director and leader of Art Basel, an internationally renowned Switzerland-based art show, had the vision to use Miami Beach as a host city for a temporary traveling Art Basel exhibition in 2002. The show did more than bring a good deal of attention to South Florida. Art Basel partnered with the city and its local institutions to create parallel programming, bringing Miami alive with galleries, street fairs and events at its convention center as attendees poured in. Read on...

David Muller

Stagecraft is an indispensable part of the statecraft hotel executives perform in a variety of venues, before a variety of attendees, on behalf of a variety of issues. For that presentation to be a success, there must a distinctive look and feel that captures the essence of what a specific hotel represents; there must be an exclusive design, and a physical expression of the same, that is breathtaking in its use of color, lighting, set pieces and other materials. Achieving that goal is a collaborative effort between a hotel executive and the experts responsible for this project. Honoring that mission is an absolute priority. Read on...

Valeriano Antonioli

Hotel architecture and design is a hot topic in the hospitality industry lately, as new hotels are constantly being built around the world and existing hotels are showcasing million dollar renovations. Owners and investors are getting more involved with interior designers and architects in order to spend time discussing the hotel or brand vision before going any further. Owners and hoteliers are understanding more and more the need for smart design concepts and smart decisions in terms of renovations, as they do not happen often. Read on...

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Coming up in January 2018...

Mobile Technology: Relentless Innovation

Technology has become a crucial component in attracting and retaining hotel guests, and the need to enhance a guest’s technology experience is driving a relentless pace of innovation. To meet and exceed guest expectations, 54% of hotels will spend more on technology in 2018, and mobile solutions in particular will top the list of capital investments. Many hotels are integrating mobile booking, mobile keys, mobile payments and mobile check-in into their operations. Other hotels are emphasizing the in-room experience, boosting bandwidth and upgrading flat screen TVs to more easily interface with guest mobile devices. And though not yet mainstream, there are many exciting technology developments on the near horizon. The Internet of Things (loT) is taking form in some places, and can be found in guest room control systems, voice activation systems, and in wearable sensors that can be used for access and payment options. Virtual reality headsets are available at some hotels so guests can enjoy virtual trips to exotic locations or if off-property, preview conference facilities and guest rooms. How long will it be before a hotel employs a fleet of robots for room service, or utilizes a hologram as a concierge, or installs gesture-controlled walls that feature interactive digital displays? Some hotels are already using augmented reality for translation services, or interactive wall maps, or even virtual décor. This pace of innovation is challenging property owners and brands to stay on top of the latest technology trends while still addressing current projects. The January Hotel Business Review will explore what some hotels are doing to maximize their opportunities in the mobile technology space.