The Briad Group Follows up Recent Hotel OPenings with an Aggressive Development Program

LIVINGSTON, NJ, September I4, 2005. Having successfully developed five Hilton and Marriott hotels to date in 2005, The Briad Hotel Division of The Briad Group announces the development of 12 additional projects for 2006 and 2007.

The 2005 openings include the 123-room Homewood Suites in Somerset, NJ and 104-room Homewood Suites in Wallingford, CT, under the Hilton brand, and, under the Marriott brand, the 119-room Courtyard in Farmington, CT, and two Residence Inns, one with 96 rooms in Rocky Hill, CT, and one with 123 rooms in Mt. Olive, NJ.

Twelve other projects in the pipeline are slated to open in 2006 and 2007. Construction will begin on four of these hotels by year-end 2005: a 100-room Marriott Residence Inn in Neptune, NJ, 108-room Residence Inn in Mt. Laurel, NJ, 113-room Courtyard by Marriott in Wall Township, NJ, and a 113-room Hilton Homewood Suites in Bethlehem, PA.

In addition to developing and owning franchises under long-term agreements with Hilton and Marriott, The Briad Group has the ability to manage properties under its hotel management subsidiary Briad Hospitality, L.L.C. "Our Hotel Division is a key element of Briad's continued success and growth. We value the strong relationships we have with these two great companies," said Brad Honigfeld, Chairman and CEO of The Briad Group. The Briad Group has been developing extended- and limited-stay hotels across the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic states for the past five years, with thirteen hotels developed from the ground up. The company has developed properties under the Residence Inn, Courtyard and Spring Hill Suites brands for Marriott; and the Homewood Suites and Hilton Garden Inn brands for Hilton.

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