Business & Finance

UNLV Harrah Hotel College Ranked World's Best for Hospitality & Leisure Management

LAS VEGAS, NV. March 16, 2017 - UNLV’s William F. Harrah Hotel College was recently ranked the world’s best for hospitality and leisure.

The annual QS World University Rankings highlight top-performing programs in 46 disciplines and this year added Hospitality & Leisure Management as one of four new “by subject” categories. The Harrah Hotel College took the top spot in the inaugural subject ranking and was followed by Switzerland’s Ecole hôtelière de Lausanne and Hong Kong Polytechnic University.

Based on an assessment of academic reputation, employer reputation, and research impact, the QS World University Rankings are designed to help prospective students identify the world’s top programs in their fields of interest.

“Our strong global industry partnerships and location in the entertainment and hospitality capital of the world offer unparalleled opportunities for our students and alumni,” said Harrah Hotel College dean Stowe Shoemaker. “The Harrah Hotel College’s high ranking illustrates our commitment to really doubling down on hospitality and educating the future leaders of the industry.”

Momentum is at an all-time high for Harrah Hotel College students, faculty, donors, and alumni as the college prepares to celebrate its 50th anniversary and experience the grand opening of Hospitality Hall, in which classes will begin spring of 2018. The resort-like academic building will feature numerous unique amenities including a student-run café, a state-of-the-art teaching kitchen, technology labs, and a golf center.

The annual rankings, released March 7, were compiled by the British firm Quacquarelli Symonds and are considered among the most widely read international university rankings.

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.