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New Products & Services

IDeaS G3 RMS Gives New Revenue Opportunity to Resorts and Hotels with Component Room Optimization - an Industry First

Resorts and hotels with component rooms can now automate pricing decisions, reduce the burden of managing complex room types and tailor the guest experience

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MINNEAPOLIS – November 14, 2017 – Though ubiquitous in resorts and hotels today, component rooms and flexible inventory are a tricky business for revenue managers. These unique rooms have traditionally required manual pricing and constant oversight – and are often undersold because of their complexity compared to standard rooms.

To help hoteliers maximize profit potential, IDeaS Revenue Solutions has added a new capability to IDeaS G3 Revenue Management System (IDeaS G3 RMS), the industry’s most widely used revenue management solution. Powered by SAS® analytics, this new IDeaS G3 RMS feature allows revenue managers to optimize all combinations of room types and build a revenue strategy specifically for flexible inventory – all based on guest demand and price sensitivity.

IDeaS G3 RMS is now the only cloud-based revenue management tool that automates component room price optimization. Combined with sophisticated pricing and inventory control decisions, powerful forecasting and interactive reporting dashboards, component room pricing showcases IDeaS' commitment to solving the unique and complex business challenges facing hotels and resorts.

“Resorts and hotels are threatened every day by new entrants into an already competitive arena. Component rooms, or virtual room types, allow hotels to better serve their guests through a personalized experience that meets the unique needs of each guest,” said Sanjay Nagalia, chief operating officer for IDeaS. “By helping hotels understand which components of a room to sell and at what price, we enable our clients to build a revenue strategy that gives them a competitive advantage in their market and an upper hand when it comes to pricing at the room type level for both group and transient business.”

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The new capability allows resorts and hotels with component rooms to account for larger or premium room types and optimize their business strategy based on the most relevant market data and demand indicators. With IDeaS G3 RMS, revenue managers now have the confidence to automatically price and offer fully flexible inventory in order achieve the greatest profitability and business mix for their property.

“This technology has enabled us to look at inventory by type or segment and actually make decisions to yield room types uniquely across different channels,” said Agnelo Fernandes, senior vice president for Terranea Resort. “Terranea is very unique, with 582 keys and a mix of rooms, suites, villas, casitas & bungalows. We find ourselves diving into IDeaS for every decision, and that has helped us become a lot more efficient. IDeaS helped us understand pricing, availability and demand for each room in order to optimize profitability.”

Click here for more information about IDeaS G3 RMS.

Tweet this: @IDeaS_RevOpt #RevenueManagement system is first to allow hotels & resorts to automate component room pricing. www.ideas.com/about/news

About IDeaS

With more than 1.6 million rooms priced daily on its advanced systems, IDeaS Revenue Solutions leads the industry with the latest revenue management software solutions and advisory services. Powered by SAS® and with nearly three decades of experience, IDeaS proudly supports more than 10,000 clients in 111 countries and is relentless about providing hoteliers with insightful ways to manage the data behind hotel pricing. IDeaS empowers clients to build and maintain revenue management cultures – from single entities to world-renowned estates – by focusing on a simple promise: Driving Better Revenue. IDeaS has the knowledge, expertise and maturity to build upon proven revenue management principles with next-generation analytics for more user-friendly, insightful and profitable revenue opportunities – not just for rooms, but across the entire hotel enterprise. For more information, visit www.ideas.com.

Media Contact:
Tim Nelson
Padilla for IDeaS Revenue Solutions
tim.nelson@padillaco.com
+1 612 455 1789

Coming Up In The December Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Hotel Law: Issues & Events
There is not a single area of a hotel’s operation that isn’t touched by some aspect of the law. Hotels and management companies employ an army of lawyers to advise and, if necessary, litigate issues which arise in the course of conducting their business. These lawyers typically specialize in specific areas of the law – real estate, construction, development, leasing, liability, franchising, food & beverage, human resources, environmental, insurance, taxes and more. In addition, issues and events can occur within the industry that have a major impact on the whole, and can spur further legal activity. One event which is certain to cause repercussions is Marriott International’s acquisition of Starwood Hotels and Resorts Worldwide. This newly combined company is now the largest hotel company in the world, encompassing 30 hotel brands, 5,500 hotels under management, and 1.1 million hotel rooms worldwide. In the hospitality industry, scale is particularly important – the most profitable companies are those with the most rooms in the most locations. As a result, this mega- transaction is likely to provoke an increase in Mergers & Acquisitions industry-wide. Many experts believe other larger hotel companies will now join forces with smaller operators to avoid being outpaced in the market. Companies that had not previously considered consolidation are now more likely to do so. Another legal issue facing the industry is the regulation of alternative lodging companies such as Airbnb and other firms that offer private, short-term rentals. Cities like San Francisco, Los Angeles and Santa Monica are at the forefront of efforts to legalize and control short-term rentals. However, those cities are finding it’s much easier to adopt regulations on short-term rentals than it is to actually enforce them. The December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine these and other critical issues pertaining to hotel law and how some companies are adapting to them.