Hyatt Enters Agreement for Hyatt Regency Coco Beach Resort in Puerto Rico

USA, Chicago, Illinois. July 01, 2019

Hyatt Hotels Corporation (NYSE:H) announced today that a Hyatt affiliate has entered into a franchise agreement with Coco Hotel 1 LLC for a new hotel, expected to open July 2019 as a Hyatt affiliated hotel and then become Hyatt Regency Coco Beach Resort after an extensive renovation is completed this fall. The 486-room hotel with 93 branded residencies will be managed by Aimbridge Hospitality and signifies Hyatt's continued brand growth on the island of Puerto Rico and across the Caribbean region. The hotel will be the brand's only full-service property in Puerto Rico. The hotel will operate as The Resort at Coco Beach, a Hyatt affiliated hotel, from July 2019 until the renovation is completed.

The hotel will join four select-service Hyatt hotels open in Puerto Rico: Hyatt House San Juan, Hyatt Place Manati, Hyatt Place San Juan Bayamon and Hyatt Place San Juan City Center.

"The expansive redevelopment of this premiere beachfront property is a testament to the confidence among owners and developers in the destination of Puerto Rico and the Hyatt brand," said Camilo Bolaños, vice president of development and real estate - Latin America and Caribbean, Hyatt. "We are pleased to continue our strong brand growth in the region, proudly supporting Puerto Rico's upward tourism sector, which we believe has an even brighter future ahead."

The hotel will be situated on a 1,000-acre peninsula within a private development known as Coco Beach on the northeast coast of Puerto Rico that includes 36 holes of championship golf. In close proximity to San Juan's Luis Munoz Marin International Airport, the hotel will offer guests approximately 37,000 square feet of flexible meeting and event space, spacious guestrooms including 93 upgraded suites with in-room whirlpool tubs and kitchenettes, a club lounge and locally inspired dining destinations. Prior to its significant redesign, renovation and rebrand, the hotel was Melia Coco Beach.

Once open this summer, the new hotel will offer a seamless, intuitive experience for leisure and business travelers alike. Guests will enjoy a full range of services and amenities, including notable culinary experiences, stress-free environments for seamless gatherings, and expansive technology-enabled facilities for meetings and events, along with expert planners who adhere to every detail with high-touch experiences for event attendees.

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