The Lost Stone Villas & Spa Joins The Unbound Collection by Hyatt

USA, Chicago, Illinois. August 05, 2019

Hyatt Hotels Corporation (NYSE: H) announced today that The Lost Stone Villas & Spa officially joined The Unbound Collection by Hyatt in Tengchong, Yunnan Province of Southwest China, marking the second property under The Unbound Collection by Hyatt in Greater China. The resort, built using six types of natural stone used throughout the property's paths, walls and roof of the buildings, received its namesake as it blends seamlessly into the nearby mountains, almost appearing lost in nature.

"We are pleased to expand The Unbound Collection by Hyatt brand in China with The Lost Stone, an all-villa resort, located near the Yunfeng Mountain Forest Park," said Stephen Ho, president, Greater China, global operations, Hyatt. "We look forward to welcoming our guests to embark on a spiritually enriching journey at the hotel, where they can escape from the distractions and discover another unique and story worthy property within the collection."

Nestled at the foot of Yunfeng Mountain, which means Cloud Peak, The Lost Stone is just over 15 miles (25 kilometers) from the border of Myanmar. Fifty free-standing garden villas are discreetly laid out across the ‘Ever Young' valley, interspersed with luxurious flowering gardens and views of the Cloudy Peak Mountain. The area is known for its volcanic hot springs and is revered as a sacred pilgrimage place by Taoists across southeast Asia.

World-famous Japanese architect Kengo Kuma designed the all-villa resort as an ideal harmony of nature and contemporary architecture. The resort blends seamlessly into the folds of the mountain thanks to various types of natural local stone throughout the property, including white marble and lava stone. Renowned hotel interiors specialist LTW Studio from Singapore designed the interiors to reflect the rich cultures of the ethnic minorities that inhabit the region, including the Lisu, Nakhi, Jingpo, Miao, Wa and Bai tribes. Their vibrant costumes, jewelry and craft techniques - from rattan hats and baskets, to rustic hand-woven linens and the delicate cotton of their lanterns - inspire the interiors of the villas and public spaces. The result is a celebration of color and texture that evokes rich stories and an exotic ambience.

Guestrooms Starting at 1,572 square feet (146 square meters), the villas feature a separate bedroom, marble bathroom, living and dining spaces, a kitchen, plus an in-villa spa treatment room. Each villa also has a private outdoor courtyard and lounging garden planted with colorful 100-year-old rhododendron flowers, plus a hot spring pool carved from a single block of granite where guests can enjoy the mountain's high-grade spring water. Honoring Yunfeng Mountain's Taoist culture, the all-villa resort has created Tao Spa, providing therapeutic hot spring and spa experiences designed to enhance the harmony between nature and human beings.

Dining and Drinking Exquisite dining and socializing experiences highlighting organic local ingredients are served up at Cloud Clubhouse. This all-day restaurant overlooking the forested mountains is a contemporary setting offering a choice of Western or local breakfasts, including fresh flower rice noodles in a stone pot. Nourishing hotpots and other local favorites prepared with seasonal and wild ingredients are served during lunch and dinner. Guests can relax with refreshments, including on-site brewed pu'er tea made from the ancient tea plants and locally-roasted Baoshan Arabica coffee. Within the Cloud Clubhouse, Cloud Bar is an exclusive destination to unwind with premium wines, cocktails, beers and spirits.

The Lost Stone also manages two unique restaurants that are a short drive from the resort where guests can savor mountain cuisine. Inspired by the Lisu minority, Lisu Ethnic Restaurant is located in an ancient carved wooden home and serves tribal specialties including roast pork, banana-leaf grilled meats, pork ribs in bamboo alongside an open-air bonfire. Nearby, The Veggie Restaurant serves thoughtfully crafted vegetarian cuisine featuring rare and healthy ingredients such as wild mushrooms and edible herbs from the surrounding mountains.

Meetings & Events Serving as the perfect backdrop for destination weddings, events and meetings. the resort offers two beautiful multi-function banquet halls of 3,767 square feet (350 square meters) and 2,690 square feet (250 square meters), hosting up to 200 people. Each event space is filled with natural light and mountain views, while also providing premium conference facilities ideal for trainings, seminars, or high-end banquets. A professional banquet team and event planners are on hand to curate each personalized occasion. Meanwhile, cultural and nature experiences, such as releasing floating lamps on the river, mountain hiking and stargazing, offer creative opportunities for team-building and memorable guest adventures in this nature-filled destination.

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