Chesapeake Lodging Trust Announces Agreement to Sell New York Hotels for $138 Million or $450K Per Room

USA, Arlington, Virginia. August 21, 2019

Chesapeake Lodging Trust (NYSE:CHSP) (the "Trust") announced today that it has entered into an agreement to sell the 122-room Hyatt Herald Square New York and the 185-room Hyatt Place New York Midtown South, both located in New York, New York, for an aggregate sale price of $138.0 million, or approximately $450,000 per key, subject to customary pro-rations at closing. The proposed sale by the Trust of these New York hotels is anticipated to occur in mid-to-late September 2019 prior to completion of the Trust's proposed merger with Park Hotels & Resorts Inc. ("Park").

The proposed merger remains subject to receipt of the required approval of the Trust's shareholders and completion of other customary closing requirements and conditions. A special meeting of the Trust's shareholders to consider and vote upon the proposed merger has been scheduled for September 10, 2019.

The Trust acquired the Hyatt Herald Square New York in December 2011 for $52.0 million, or $428,000 per key, and the Hyatt Place New York Midtown South in March 2013 for $76.2 million, or $412,000 per key. The $138.0 million aggregate sale price represents a 5.9% trailing twelve month NOI cap rate.

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Architecture & Design: Biophilic Design

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