Click here to post news now

Hotel Newswire Top Pick

Understanding Your Customer Acquisition Cost (CAC) - Then and Now
Gary Isenberg, President, LWHA Asset & Property Management Services

In the early years of my career, before the industry had revenue managers, managing hotel bookings was relatively straightforward and easier to understand. Reservations managers controlled inventory and their main focus was to maximize sellouts. They had only three channels to monitor: the brand’s central reservation system; a local reservation system; and group sales. This simplicity had its challenges. For one thing, inventory had to be opened and closed manually. Once at the Sheraton Russell in New York, the reservations manager went on vacation and her fill-in did not follow the correct sequence of key strokes and processes to close out inventory. Read more.

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review

Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Original, Authentic and Localized
Corporate hotel developers once believed that their customers appreciated a homogenous design experience; that regardless of their physical location, they would be reassured and comforted by a similar look, feel and design in all their brand properties. Inevitably this led to a sense of impersonality, predictability and boredom in their guests who ultimately rejected this notion. Today's hotel customer is expecting an experience that is far more original and authentic - an experience that features a design aesthetic that is more location-oriented, inspired by local cultures, attractions, food and art. Architects and designers are investing more time to engage the local culture, and to integrate the unique qualities of each location into their hotel design. Expression of this design principle can take many shapes and forms. One trend is the adaptive reuse of existing facilities - from factories to office buildings - as a strategic way to preserve and affirm local culture. Many of these projects are not necessarily conversions of historic properties into grand, five-star landmark hotels, but rather a complete transformation of historic structures into mixed-use, residential, and hotel projects that take full advantage of their existing location. Another trend is the addition of local art into a hotel's design scheme. From small sculptures and photography to large-scale installations, integrating local art is an effective means to elevate and enhance a guest's perception and experience of the hotel. These are just a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.