Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Adams

Mark S. Adams

Partner & Senior Member, JMBM's Global Hospitality Group, Jeffer Mangels Butler & Mitchell LLP

Mark S. Adams focuses his practice on business litigation, including, contracts, corporate and partnership disputes, and hospitality litigation. On behalf of hotel and resort owners, Mr. Adams has successfully litigated the termination of long-term, no-cut, hotel management agreements, franchise agreements, fiduciary duty issues, investor-owner disputes, TOT assessments, and more. He also has significant litigation experience in representing real estate developers and real estate investors. Mr. Adams has wide-ranging trial experience in commercial disputes, including complex multi-party litigation and class actions. He has tried numerous cases in state courts, federal courts, and in domestic and international arbitrations, and is a frequent author and speaker on trial practice. Mr. Adams's trial wins have been covered by Forbes, Reuters, Life Science Weekly and other publications. He has obtained two of California's annual 50 largest jury verdicts in the same year. Mr. Adams has taken or defended nearly 1,000 depositions throughout North America, Europe and the Middle East. He has been quoted as an expert on noncompete agreements in the Wall Street Journal. The hospitality attorneys in the JMBM's Global Hospitality Group® of Jeffer Mangels Butler & Mitchell LLP comprise the premier hospitality practice in a full-service law firm. Our team of hotel lawyers and business advisors has more than $68 billion in hotel transaction experience, involving more than 1,500 properties located around the globe.

Mr. Adams can be contacted at 949-623-7230 or markadams@jmbm.com

Coming up in May 2018...

Eco-Friendly Practices: The Greening of Your Bottom Line

There are strong moral and ethical reasons why a hotel should incorporate eco-friendly practices into their business but it is also becoming abundantly clear that “going green” can dramatically improve a hotel's bottom line. When energy-saving measures are introduced - fluorescent bulbs, ceiling fans, linen cards, lights out cards, motion sensors for all public spaces, and energy management systems - energy bills are substantially reduced. When water-saving equipment is introduced - low-flow showerheads, low-flow toilets, waterless urinals, and serving water only on request in restaurants - water bills are also considerably reduced. Waste hauling is another major expense which can be lowered through recycling efforts and by avoiding wastefully-packaged products. Vendors can be asked to deliver products in minimal wrapping, and to deliver products one day, and pick up the packaging materials the next day - generating substantial savings. In addition, renewable sources of energy (solar, geothermal, wind, etc.) have substantially improved the economics of using alternative energies at the property level. There are other compelling reasons to initiate sustainability practices in their operation. Being green means guests and staff are healthier, which can lead to an increase in staff retention, as well as increased business from health conscious guests. Also, sooner or later, all properties will be sold, and green hotels will command a higher price due to its energy efficiencies. Finally, some hotels qualify for tax credits, subsidies and rebates from local, regional and federal governments for the eco-friendly investments they've made in their hotels. The May issue of the Hotel Business Review will document how some hotels are integrating sustainable practices into their operations and how their hotels are benefiting from them.