Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Tossell

David Tossell

Vice President, DataArt

David Tossell, CTC, Vice President, DataArt started in the mailroom of his family's travel agency 20+ years ago and made his way across the industry working for companies such as Sabre, Travelocity and Virtuoso. David joined DataArt in 2014 as Vice President, Travel & Hospitality Practice, having most recently served as Vice President of Marketing for WMPH Vacations / iCruise.com. Mr. Tossell is a serial entrepreneur, with experience ranging from global product marketing & development, to marketing promotions, business operations, SEO/SEM, and email marketing. Over the course of his career, he led many start-up businesses, including the Sabre Rewards travel agent loyalty program, and APInet, the travel distribution industry's first extranet. Most recently, Mr. Tossell oversaw the creation of TimeshareAdvisor - a review website for timeshare owners. At Travelocity, David oversaw the account team for the affiliate / private label distribution business with over 1,900 partners including Yahoo, AOL, American Express and AAA. During his time as CEO of CruiseLabs, he lead the company to a “runner-up” spot in the PhoCusWright Travel Innovation Summit and went on to establish a global network of over 70 cruise research and booking web sites, Mr. Tossell received his BS in Business Administration from Pepperdine University and earned his Certified Travel Counselor (CTC) designation from The Travel Institute in 1997. He co-authored *Technology In The Travel Industry* (1998 edition), a textbook for The Travel Institute's CTC training curriculum. Mr. Tossell lives in Texas with his wife and two sons. The couple founded several programs in the Dallas / Fort Worth area aimed at helping families with Autistic children to travel and assisting with the education/rehabilitation of Autistic children via technology.

Mr. Tossell can be contacted at

Coming up in December 2019...

Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

According to a recent study, the hospitality industry accounted for 2.9 trillion dollars in sales and in the U.S. alone, was responsible for 1 in 9 jobs. In an industry of that scope and dimension, legal issues touch every aspect of a hotel's operation, and legal services are required in order to conform to all prevailing laws and regulations. Though not all hotels face the same issues, there are some industry-wide subjects that are of concern more broadly. One of those matters is the issue of immigration and how it affects the ability of hotels to recruit qualified employees. The hotel industry is currently facing a labor crisis; the U.S. Labor Department estimates that there are 600,000 unfilled jobs in the industry. Part of the problem contributing to this labor shortage is the lack of H2B visas for low-skilled workers, combined with the difficulty in obtaining J-1 visas for temporary workers. Because comprehensive immigration reform is not being addressed politically, hotel managers expect things are going to get worse before they get better. Corporate cyber security is another major legal issue the industry must address. Hotels are under enormous pressure in this area given the large volume of customer financial transactions they handle daily. Recently, a federal court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission had the power to regulate corporate cyber security, so it is incumbent on hotels to establish data security programs in order to prevent data breaches. The lack of such programs could cause hotels to face legal threats from government agencies, class action lawsuits, and damage to their brand image if a data breach should occur. These are just two of the critical issues that the December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.