Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Dunphy

Maggy Dunphy

Spa Director, Stowe Mountain Lodge

I grew up in a family of seven children. Believe it or not - I was quite the tomboy - most certainly not a spa girl. And each and every day I had one goal - to beat the boys in everything. And I usually did. It wasn't very helpful in my teenage years as I was concerned more with beating the boys, than kissing them. Sports became an outlet for me and I attribute my drive for perfection, ambition to win, passion for excellence, and my unique leadership style on the coaches and athletes that believed in me and taught me the principles of teamwork. I began my career in hospitality as a massage therapist in Vail, escaping the East Coast and management responsibilities to become a free spirit therapist in the mountains of Colorado. That didn't last long as leading people was in my blood. I was in the right place at the right time - and have grown up in the spa industry. My first Spa Director job paid me a whopping $14,000, but I received a small commission on every treatment performed. I turned a janitor closet into a massage room, so we wouldn't turn away the business. It was definitely not about the “experience” in those days. So much has changed in the spa industry and I am blessed to have grown up with Destination Hotels as my “bus driver”. I knew I was on the right bus!

Please visit www.stowemountainlodge.com for more information.

Ms. Dunphy can be contacted at 802-760-4703 or mdunphy@destinationhotels.com

Coming up in April 2019...

Guest Service: A Culture of YES

In a recent global consumers report, 97% of the participants said that customer service is a major factor in their loyalty to a brand, and 76% said they view customer service as the true test of how much a company values them. And since there is no industry more reliant on customer satisfaction than the hotel industry, managers must be unrelenting in their determination to hire, train and empower the very best people, and to create a culture of exceptional customer service within their organization. Of course, this begins with hiring the right people. There are people who are naturally service-oriented; people who are warm, empathetic, enthusiastic, pleasant, thoughtful and optimistic; people who take pride in their ability to solve problems for the hotel guests they are serving. Then, those same employees must be empowered to solve problems using their own judgment, without having to track down a manager to do it. This is how seamless problem solving and conflict resolution are achieved in guest service. This willingness to empower employees is part of creating a Culture of Yes within an organization.  The goal is to create an environment in which everyone is striving to say “Yes”, rather than figuring out ways to say, “No”. It is essential that this attitude be instilled in all frontline, customer-facing, employees. Finally, in order to ensure that the hotel can generate a consistent level of performance across a wide variety of situations, management must also put in place well-defined systems and standards, and then educate their employees about them. Every employee must be aware of and responsible for every standard that applies in their department. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.