Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Suttle

Denise Suttle

Assistant Director of Convention Services, Albuquerque Convention & Visitors Bureau

Denise Suttle, CMP, has been with the Albuquerque CVB since moving to New Mexico from Oklahoma in 1991. She is the Assistant Director of Convention Services, working with citywide conventions that utilize the Albuquerque Convention Center and multiple hotels, sports events, and hotel meetings of all kinds. Ms. Suttle began at the CVB in convention sales as a telemarketer, earned increasingly responsible sales positions and eventually served as the division's interim vice president. Her switch to convention services was based on a desire to follow through with the relationships built during the sales process, to help her clients experience the best possible convention with her hands-on approach. Ms. Suttle sees each client as a potential partner and friend, and feels the convention is as much her responsibility as the meeting planner's. She believes that a successful CVB services manager must advocate for the customer, the city and the venues all at the same time—a juggling act that requires focus, patience and—above all—passion for customer service. A member of PCMA since 1996 and ESPA since 2000, Ms. Suttle has served on the board of directors, is past chairman of the marketing & communications committee, former editor of the quarterly E-newsletter “ACOMmodate,” and was a member of the continuing education committee. Ms. Suttle was part of the team responsible for writing the chapter on Convention Services Managers for the fifth edition of Professional Meeting Management published in 2005 by PCMA. She has participated in numerous panel presentations for ESPA and PCMA, and has presented convention services as a career path during Mega Mentor sessions of the PCMA Student Track.

Please visit http://www.espaonline.org for more information.

Ms. Suttle can be contacted at 180073399183335 or suttle@itsatrip.org

Coming up in December 2020...

Hotel Law: Protecting Guest Privacy

Every business is obligated to protect their customers from identity theft but unfortunately, data breaches have become all too common. In an effort to protect a guest's right to privacy and to safeguard their personal data, the European Union passed a General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that could hold hotels legally liable for any breaches that expose a customer's sensitive personal information. Though the GDPR only pertains to EU citizens' data, any international business that mishandles their data can be legally responsible. Another legal issue of concern is the fight involving hotel "resort fees." Several states attorney generals have recently filed suit against two major hotel chains in an effort to litigate this practice. Their suit alleges that these companies are "engaged in deceptive and misleading pricing practices and their failure to disclose fees is in violation of consumer protection laws." The suit seeks to force the hotel chains to advertise the true price of their hotel rooms. There are several other legal issues that the industry is being forced to address. Sexual harassment prevention in the workplace is still top of mind for hotel employers-particularly in New York and California, which now statutorily require harassment training. Hotels and motels in California will also soon be required to train all their employees on human trafficking awareness. Immigration issues are also of major concern to hotel employers, especially in the midst of a severe labor shortage. The government is issuing fewer H2B visas for low-skilled workers, as well as J-1 visas for temporary workers. Though there is little hope for any comprehensive immigration reform, hotel lobbying groups are actively seeking legal remedies to alleviate this problem. These are just a few of the critical issues that the December issue of the Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.