Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Tocguigny

Yvonne Tocguigny

Chief Creative and Strategy Officer, Archer Malmo

In 1980, Yvonne Tocquigny launched her company, Tocquigny (TOH-KEY-KNEE), and from its inception, the digitally minded creative shop has focused on transforming brands. Adweek, B2B and Clutch have all named Tocquigny a top agency, honors reflective of the shop's work for clients such as CITGO, Jeep, Dell, Hitachi, USAA and Caterpillar. Collecting and building a talented team of makers, thinkers and doers — all working within a company culture that complements the uniqueness of Austin — Ms. Tocquigny is regarded as a forward-thinker in the industry, one who looks beyond the norm to reach goals and objectives. Ms. Tocquigny has become a business trailblazer, a leading marketer, a sought-after speaker, a respected writer and a mentor to many. In 2015, Archer Malmo, a leading brand communications agency based in Memphis, approached Ms. Tocquigny to consider an acquisition. Learning that Archer Malmo shared many of Tocquigny's philosophies and values, and understanding that the combination of the two shops would better serve the agency's clients, Ms. Tocquigny made the bold move to join forces. Despite the change of the company name, the agency's work for clients in Austin and throughout the country remains the same, as have Ms. Tocquigny's responsibilities. She continues to advise companies on topics such as digital marketing strategies, branding, messaging, business planning and ways to structure marketing organizations. Yvonne and her senior staff continue to be responsible for generating business for the Austin office. As Creative and Strategy Officer of Archer Malmo, Austin, Ms. Tocquigny remains a popular columnist for the Austin Business Journal and is a frequent speaker for groups of CEOs across the country, international Six Sigma organizations, CEOs in the banking and finance industry and groups of startup entrepreneurs. Recently, Yvonne presented at BMA15, the largest B2B marketing conference in the world. Ms. Tocquigny is a Founding Partner and mentor for The Capital Factory, an incubator for startup companies that draws business talent from across the country. She is an inaugural member of the Advisory Council for the School of Undergraduate Studies at the University of Texas and a member of the Advisory Board of the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas.

Please visit http://archermalmo.com/ for more information.

Ms. Tocguigny can be contacted at 512-532-2800 or Yvonnet@archermalmo.com

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.