Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Sewell

Alexandra Sewell

Vice President of Mid-Market & Enterprise Marketing, Comcast Business

As Vice President of Mid-Market & Enterprise Marketing for Comcast Business, Alexandra Sewell is responsible for defining the go-to-market strategies for the enterprise segment with a focus on building and expanding Comcast's Built4Enterprise initiatives. In addition, Ms. Sewell is responsible for developing the marketing strategies to generate subscriber and revenue growth within mid-market and strategic vertical segments. During her career at Comcast, Ms. Sewell has focused on developing innovative product, marketing and public relations strategies that have resulted in significant sales and revenue growth. Most notably Ms. Sewell was responsible for the successful launch of Business Hospitality, a product suite consisting of Ethernet, Internet, Video and Voice services packaged for the Hospitality industry. In addition, she was instrumental in launching the Business Services video product portfolio for small and medium-sized businesses, and she led the Business Services component of Project Cavalry, Comcast's all-digital initiative touching almost every residential and business customer in the Comcast footprint. An industry leader, Ms. Sewell has more than 19 years of experience within the cable industry spanning virtually every aspect of product management, marketing and public relations. In 2014, Ms. Sewell was recognized as one of Fierce Telecom's Women in Wireline, 2014 which honors top women executives in the wireline segment of the telecom industry. Prior to joining Comcast's Business Services team, Ms. Sewell held various sales, marketing, public relations and business development positions within the Comcast family of companies. Her previous roles have included: Director of Marketing Solutions for Comcast Networks; Director of Strategic Sales Alliances for Comcast Cable; Director of Marketing and Public Relations for CN8, The Comcast Network; Corporate Marketing Manager & Senior Publicist for QVC, the television shopping network (prior to its sale to Liberty Interactive). Ms. Sewell holds a bachelor of arts from Pennsylvania State University. She is a member of the Cable & Telecommunications Association for Marketing (CTAM), Women in Cable Telecommunications (WICT), Hotel Technology Next Generation (HTNG), The American Hotel & Lodging Association (AH&LA), The Healthcare Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS), and the Stadium Management Association (SMA).

Ms. Sewell can be contacted at 877-967-4999 or alex@sewellgardner.com

Coming up in October 2019...

Revenue Management: Focus On Profit

Revenue Management is still a relatively new profession within hotel operations and as such, it continues to evolve. One significant trend in this area is a shift away from using revenue as the foundation to generate key performance indicators (KPIs) and to instead place the emphasis on profit. Traditionally, revenue managers have relied on total revenue per available room (TrevPAR) and revenue per available room (RevPAR) as the basis of their KPIs. Now, some revenue managers are using gross operating profit per available room (GOPPAR) as their primary KPI. This puts profit at the center of revenue management strategy, and managers are increasingly searching for new ways to increase the profitability of their hotels. Return on Investment is the objective of any hotel investment, so it is only logical that profitability and ROI will be emphasized going forward. Another trend is an expanded focus on direct hotel bookings. Revenue managers know that one way to increase profitability is to steer guests away from online travel agencies (OTAs) and book directly with the hotel. This tactic also reinforces brand identity and loyalty, and encourages repeat business. In addition, it provides a valuable platform to market the hotel directly to the customer, and to upsell room upgrades or other services to them. Another trend for revenue managers involves automation in their software programs. Revenue management systems with automation are far more desirable than those without it. Automating data entry and logistics increases efficiency, allowing managers to spend more time on formulating strategy. As a bonus, an automated system helps with aggregating and interpreting data. The October issue of the Hotel Business Review will address these developments and document how some leading hotels are executing their revenue management strategies.