Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Sewell

Alexandra Sewell

Vice President of Mid-Market & Enterprise Marketing, Comcast Business

As Vice President of Mid-Market & Enterprise Marketing for Comcast Business, Alexandra Sewell is responsible for defining the go-to-market strategies for the enterprise segment with a focus on building and expanding Comcast's Built4Enterprise initiatives. In addition, Ms. Sewell is responsible for developing the marketing strategies to generate subscriber and revenue growth within mid-market and strategic vertical segments. During her career at Comcast, Ms. Sewell has focused on developing innovative product, marketing and public relations strategies that have resulted in significant sales and revenue growth. Most notably Ms. Sewell was responsible for the successful launch of Business Hospitality, a product suite consisting of Ethernet, Internet, Video and Voice services packaged for the Hospitality industry. In addition, she was instrumental in launching the Business Services video product portfolio for small and medium-sized businesses, and she led the Business Services component of Project Cavalry, Comcast's all-digital initiative touching almost every residential and business customer in the Comcast footprint. An industry leader, Ms. Sewell has more than 19 years of experience within the cable industry spanning virtually every aspect of product management, marketing and public relations. In 2014, Ms. Sewell was recognized as one of Fierce Telecom's Women in Wireline, 2014 which honors top women executives in the wireline segment of the telecom industry. Prior to joining Comcast's Business Services team, Ms. Sewell held various sales, marketing, public relations and business development positions within the Comcast family of companies. Her previous roles have included: Director of Marketing Solutions for Comcast Networks; Director of Strategic Sales Alliances for Comcast Cable; Director of Marketing and Public Relations for CN8, The Comcast Network; Corporate Marketing Manager & Senior Publicist for QVC, the television shopping network (prior to its sale to Liberty Interactive). Ms. Sewell holds a bachelor of arts from Pennsylvania State University. She is a member of the Cable & Telecommunications Association for Marketing (CTAM), Women in Cable Telecommunications (WICT), Hotel Technology Next Generation (HTNG), The American Hotel & Lodging Association (AH&LA), The Healthcare Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS), and the Stadium Management Association (SMA).

Ms. Sewell can be contacted at 877-967-4999 or alex@sewellgardner.com

Coming up in December 2019...

Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

According to a recent study, the hospitality industry accounted for 2.9 trillion dollars in sales and in the U.S. alone, was responsible for 1 in 9 jobs. In an industry of that scope and dimension, legal issues touch every aspect of a hotel's operation, and legal services are required in order to conform to all prevailing laws and regulations. Though not all hotels face the same issues, there are some industry-wide subjects that are of concern more broadly. One of those matters is the issue of immigration and how it affects the ability of hotels to recruit qualified employees. The hotel industry is currently facing a labor crisis; the U.S. Labor Department estimates that there are 600,000 unfilled jobs in the industry. Part of the problem contributing to this labor shortage is the lack of H2B visas for low-skilled workers, combined with the difficulty in obtaining J-1 visas for temporary workers. Because comprehensive immigration reform is not being addressed politically, hotel managers expect things are going to get worse before they get better. Corporate cyber security is another major legal issue the industry must address. Hotels are under enormous pressure in this area given the large volume of customer financial transactions they handle daily. Recently, a federal court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission had the power to regulate corporate cyber security, so it is incumbent on hotels to establish data security programs in order to prevent data breaches. The lack of such programs could cause hotels to face legal threats from government agencies, class action lawsuits, and damage to their brand image if a data breach should occur. These are just two of the critical issues that the December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.