Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Paquin

Megan Paquin

Marketing Manager, Hyatt Regency Orlando

Megan Paquin, APR is marketing manager at Hyatt Regency Orlando. Located in the heart of Orlando's International Drive resort area and directly connected to the Orange County Convention Center, Hyatt Regency Orlando offers unparalleled leisure, meetings and convention facilities. Featuring 1,639 guestrooms and 315,000 square feet of meeting space - and with over two million square feet of space in the Orange County Convention Center to which the hotel is attached - Hyatt Regency Orlando is the largest convention hotel for the brand in the United States.

Ms. Paquin is an accredited and award-winning marketing communications professional, trusted to lead strategic marketing campaigns for some of the world's most respected brands. She started her career with MGM Resorts International where she specialized in international media relations and national broadcast for hotels in Las Vegas, Nev. She was a member of the opening public relations team for CityCenter, a 76-acre, mixed-use urban development with 5,900 hotel rooms. It is the largest privately funded construction project in the United States.

Fearless in her creative abilities and business acumen, Ms. Paquin went on to earn professional recognition for her work with Fry Hammond Barr, an integrated marketing agency in Orlando, Fla., on behalf of The Peabody Orlando. Leading public relations efforts for one of the nation's top meetings hotels, she and her team received several Silver and Gold Adrian Awards from Hospitality Sales and Marketing Association International (HSMAI).

Her work with Fry Hammond Barr also won awards in media relations and crisis communication from the Florida Public Relations Association (FPRA). Ms. Paquin later demonstrated her business acumen in the luxury market as communications manager at The Ritz-Carlton, Grand Cayman, a Caribbean, AAA Five-Diamond resort with 365 rooms and suites, five onsite restaurants including Blue by Eric Ripert, a la prairie spa and Greg Norman-designed golf course, before returning to Orlando to her current role at Hyatt Regency Orlando.

She is a graduate of the University of Central Florida with a B.S. in Organizational Communication, Accredited in Public Relations (APR) and an M.A. candidate in Behavioral Economics at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology. Ms. Paquin currently serves on the Global Communications Committee for Visit Orlando and is Director of Communications for MPI Orlando.

Please visit http://www.orlando.regency.hyatt.com for more information.

Ms. Paquin can be contacted at 407-284-1234 or megan.paquin@hyatt.com

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.