Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Rosenberg

Charles B. Rosenberg

Attorney, White & Case LLP

Charles (Chip) B. Rosenberg is an attorney in the Washington, DC office of White & Case LLP, where he represents private parties and foreign governments in complex international arbitrations. He has experience representing clients in disputes at the International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID) and the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), as well as under the arbitration rules of the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL). Mr. Rosenberg is the Associate Managing Editor of the World Arbitration & Mediation Review (WAMR) and a Regional Representative of the ICC Young Arbitrators Forum (ICC YAF). He has taught advanced international investment seminars at The Hague University of Applied Sciences in The Netherlands and at the American University Washington College of Law in Washington, DC. He regularly speaks at conferences and publishes articles on international arbitration related topics. Mr. Rosenberg was named a Future Leader in Who’s Who Legal: Arbitration 2017, an inaugural edition focused on outstanding attorneys aged 45 or under, which described him as “hardworking and approachable.” He also has been repeatedly recognized as a “Rising Star” by DC Super Lawyers. Prior to joining White & Case LLP, Mr. Rosenberg spent two years in The Hague, Netherlands clerking for The Honorable Charles N. Brower, who at the time was ranked the “world’s busiest arbitrator” by The American Lawyer in terms of large international arbitrations, and at the Iran-United States Claims Tribunal. Mr. Rosenberg graduated first in his class, summa cum laude, and Order of the Coif from the American University Washington College of Law. Please visit http://www.whitecase.com for more information.

Mr. Rosenberg can be contacted at 202-729-2324 or charles.rosenberg@whitecase.com

Coming up in May 2018...

Eco-Friendly Practices: The Greening of Your Bottom Line

There are strong moral and ethical reasons why a hotel should incorporate eco-friendly practices into their business but it is also becoming abundantly clear that “going green” can dramatically improve a hotel's bottom line. When energy-saving measures are introduced - fluorescent bulbs, ceiling fans, linen cards, lights out cards, motion sensors for all public spaces, and energy management systems - energy bills are substantially reduced. When water-saving equipment is introduced - low-flow showerheads, low-flow toilets, waterless urinals, and serving water only on request in restaurants - water bills are also considerably reduced. Waste hauling is another major expense which can be lowered through recycling efforts and by avoiding wastefully-packaged products. Vendors can be asked to deliver products in minimal wrapping, and to deliver products one day, and pick up the packaging materials the next day - generating substantial savings. In addition, renewable sources of energy (solar, geothermal, wind, etc.) have substantially improved the economics of using alternative energies at the property level. There are other compelling reasons to initiate sustainability practices in their operation. Being green means guests and staff are healthier, which can lead to an increase in staff retention, as well as increased business from health conscious guests. Also, sooner or later, all properties will be sold, and green hotels will command a higher price due to its energy efficiencies. Finally, some hotels qualify for tax credits, subsidies and rebates from local, regional and federal governments for the eco-friendly investments they've made in their hotels. The May issue of the Hotel Business Review will document how some hotels are integrating sustainable practices into their operations and how their hotels are benefiting from them.