Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Rosenberg

Charles B. Rosenberg

Attorney, White & Case LLP

Charles (Chip) B. Rosenberg is an attorney in the Washington, DC office of White & Case LLP, where he represents private parties and foreign governments in complex international arbitrations. He has experience representing clients in disputes at the International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID) and the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), as well as under the arbitration rules of the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL). Mr. Rosenberg is the Associate Managing Editor of the World Arbitration & Mediation Review (WAMR) and a Regional Representative of the ICC Young Arbitrators Forum (ICC YAF). He has taught advanced international investment seminars at The Hague University of Applied Sciences in The Netherlands and at the American University Washington College of Law in Washington, DC. He regularly speaks at conferences and publishes articles on international arbitration related topics. Mr. Rosenberg was named a Future Leader in Who's Who Legal: Arbitration 2017, an inaugural edition focused on outstanding attorneys aged 45 or under, which described him as “hardworking and approachable.” He also has been repeatedly recognized as a “Rising Star” by DC Super Lawyers. Prior to joining White & Case LLP, Mr. Rosenberg spent two years in The Hague, Netherlands clerking for The Honorable Charles N. Brower, who at the time was ranked the “world's busiest arbitrator” by The American Lawyer in terms of large international arbitrations, and at the Iran-United States Claims Tribunal. Mr. Rosenberg graduated first in his class, summa cum laude, and Order of the Coif from the American University Washington College of Law.

Please visit http://www.whitecase.com for more information.

Mr. Rosenberg can be contacted at 202-729-2324 or charles.rosenberg@whitecase.com

Coming up in October 2019...

Revenue Management: Focus On Profit

Revenue Management is still a relatively new profession within hotel operations and as such, it continues to evolve. One significant trend in this area is a shift away from using revenue as the foundation to generate key performance indicators (KPIs) and to instead place the emphasis on profit. Traditionally, revenue managers have relied on total revenue per available room (TrevPAR) and revenue per available room (RevPAR) as the basis of their KPIs. Now, some revenue managers are using gross operating profit per available room (GOPPAR) as their primary KPI. This puts profit at the center of revenue management strategy, and managers are increasingly searching for new ways to increase the profitability of their hotels. Return on Investment is the objective of any hotel investment, so it is only logical that profitability and ROI will be emphasized going forward. Another trend is an expanded focus on direct hotel bookings. Revenue managers know that one way to increase profitability is to steer guests away from online travel agencies (OTAs) and book directly with the hotel. This tactic also reinforces brand identity and loyalty, and encourages repeat business. In addition, it provides a valuable platform to market the hotel directly to the customer, and to upsell room upgrades or other services to them. Another trend for revenue managers involves automation in their software programs. Revenue management systems with automation are far more desirable than those without it. Automating data entry and logistics increases efficiency, allowing managers to spend more time on formulating strategy. As a bonus, an automated system helps with aggregating and interpreting data. The October issue of the Hotel Business Review will address these developments and document how some leading hotels are executing their revenue management strategies.