Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Rosenberg

Charles B. Rosenberg

Attorney, White & Case LLP

Charles (Chip) B. Rosenberg is an attorney in the Washington, DC office of White & Case LLP, where he represents private parties and foreign governments in complex international arbitrations. He has experience representing clients in disputes at the International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID) and the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), as well as under the arbitration rules of the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL). Mr. Rosenberg is the Associate Managing Editor of the World Arbitration & Mediation Review (WAMR) and a Regional Representative of the ICC Young Arbitrators Forum (ICC YAF). He has taught advanced international investment seminars at The Hague University of Applied Sciences in The Netherlands and at the American University Washington College of Law in Washington, DC. He regularly speaks at conferences and publishes articles on international arbitration related topics. Mr. Rosenberg was named a Future Leader in Who's Who Legal: Arbitration 2017, an inaugural edition focused on outstanding attorneys aged 45 or under, which described him as “hardworking and approachable.” He also has been repeatedly recognized as a “Rising Star” by DC Super Lawyers. Prior to joining White & Case LLP, Mr. Rosenberg spent two years in The Hague, Netherlands clerking for The Honorable Charles N. Brower, who at the time was ranked the “world's busiest arbitrator” by The American Lawyer in terms of large international arbitrations, and at the Iran-United States Claims Tribunal. Mr. Rosenberg graduated first in his class, summa cum laude, and Order of the Coif from the American University Washington College of Law.

Please visit http://www.whitecase.com for more information.

Mr. Rosenberg can be contacted at 202-729-2324 or charles.rosenberg@whitecase.com

Coming up in April 2019...

Guest Service: A Culture of YES

In a recent global consumers report, 97% of the participants said that customer service is a major factor in their loyalty to a brand, and 76% said they view customer service as the true test of how much a company values them. And since there is no industry more reliant on customer satisfaction than the hotel industry, managers must be unrelenting in their determination to hire, train and empower the very best people, and to create a culture of exceptional customer service within their organization. Of course, this begins with hiring the right people. There are people who are naturally service-oriented; people who are warm, empathetic, enthusiastic, pleasant, thoughtful and optimistic; people who take pride in their ability to solve problems for the hotel guests they are serving. Then, those same employees must be empowered to solve problems using their own judgment, without having to track down a manager to do it. This is how seamless problem solving and conflict resolution are achieved in guest service. This willingness to empower employees is part of creating a Culture of Yes within an organization.  The goal is to create an environment in which everyone is striving to say “Yes”, rather than figuring out ways to say, “No”. It is essential that this attitude be instilled in all frontline, customer-facing, employees. Finally, in order to ensure that the hotel can generate a consistent level of performance across a wide variety of situations, management must also put in place well-defined systems and standards, and then educate their employees about them. Every employee must be aware of and responsible for every standard that applies in their department. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.