Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Hartwright

Nick Hartwright

Co-Founder, Mill and Company Project

Nick Hartwright is one of London's leading social entrepreneurs. He is a huge supporter of the arts and culture-based projects, and wants to make them accessible to all. In the first instance he is a place-maker and has been, and is, involved in a number of exciting regeneration projects in the capital that are ultimately making people's lives, and communities, better. His projects are about regeneration not gentrification, and all of Mr. Hartwright's spaces are sustainable, deliverable and affordable. He takes on derelict buildings, places that might be crumbling, and works with local authorities to restore them, give them a new lease of life and make them focal points in local and creative communities. Mr. Hartwright's is committed to making London's art scene flourish, and is incredibly supportive of creative minds. To this end, he recently opened Green Rooms, the UKs first arts-led independent social enterprise hotel. Situated on Station Road in Wood Green, it is already changing the shape and face of the area. Mr. Hartwirght is co-founder of The Mill Co. Project, a social enterprise that provides work and project spaces at extremely competitive rates for artists and small creative companies. Tenants are provided with a space to work in, performance areas and stages to put on shows or exhibitions by night, a network of other artists to collaborate with, a creative agency they can work with, and a store where they can sell their products. Under Nick's stewardship the The Mill Co. Project has grown incredibly quickly. Starting in 2010, it now operates nearly 100,000 square foot of workspace, theatre space, cafes, bars and restaurants across London, and supports over 100 SMEs.

Mr. Hartwright can be contacted at

Coming up in May 2018...

Eco-Friendly Practices: The Greening of Your Bottom Line

There are strong moral and ethical reasons why a hotel should incorporate eco-friendly practices into their business but it is also becoming abundantly clear that “going green” can dramatically improve a hotel's bottom line. When energy-saving measures are introduced - fluorescent bulbs, ceiling fans, linen cards, lights out cards, motion sensors for all public spaces, and energy management systems - energy bills are substantially reduced. When water-saving equipment is introduced - low-flow showerheads, low-flow toilets, waterless urinals, and serving water only on request in restaurants - water bills are also considerably reduced. Waste hauling is another major expense which can be lowered through recycling efforts and by avoiding wastefully-packaged products. Vendors can be asked to deliver products in minimal wrapping, and to deliver products one day, and pick up the packaging materials the next day - generating substantial savings. In addition, renewable sources of energy (solar, geothermal, wind, etc.) have substantially improved the economics of using alternative energies at the property level. There are other compelling reasons to initiate sustainability practices in their operation. Being green means guests and staff are healthier, which can lead to an increase in staff retention, as well as increased business from health conscious guests. Also, sooner or later, all properties will be sold, and green hotels will command a higher price due to its energy efficiencies. Finally, some hotels qualify for tax credits, subsidies and rebates from local, regional and federal governments for the eco-friendly investments they've made in their hotels. The May issue of the Hotel Business Review will document how some hotels are integrating sustainable practices into their operations and how their hotels are benefiting from them.