Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Malech

Rori H. Malech

Partner, Hunton & Williams LLP

Rori Malech is a partner in the real estate practice at Hunton & Williams LLP in Washington, D.C. She concentrates her practice in the area of commercial real estate development and finance, representing hotel owners and operators, local and national developers, Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs), institutional equity investors, and institutional and non-institutional lenders. Ms. Malech focuses on acquisitions, dispositions and financings for both borrowers and lenders, negotiation of management and license agreements for hotel owners and operators, workouts and equity and debt participations, in each instance, involving a variety of asset types throughout the United States, including hotel, mixed-use development, office, retail, condominium, multi-family and residential and commercial property. Namely, Ms. Malech has represented the following: • A hospitality investment firm on its sale of seven Manhattan limited-service hotels to a joint venture in a transaction valued at $571.4 million, which included senior and mezzanine financing in an aggregate amount of $335 million; • A leading private equity firm in the acquisition of 38 limited service and extended stay hotels, 4,950 rooms, for $590 million, and negotiation of mortgage and mezzanine financing from two major financial institutions, which also involved the securitization of the mortgage and a mezzanine tier; • An institutional lender in connection with the $159.5 million mortgage and mezzanine financing of a historic hotel in Washington, DC., which included the sale of one of the floors as an air space parcel to a vacation club and the negotiation of the documents governing the relationship between the hotel and vacation club; • A major insurance company in connection with the upsizing of a $177 million preferred equity interest in a hotel located in the heart of New York City's Times Square; and • A hospitality REIT in the acquisition of a $300 million portfolio of 13 hotels, 1,913 rooms, then advised the REIT in the $450 million financing secured by a larger portfolio of 44 hotels being acquired from three different sellers. A frequent public speaker on real estate matters, Ms. Malech was recognized by The Legal 500 in 2013. She joined Hunton & Williams from Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP, where she practiced for 17 years and served as co-chair of that firm's Washington real estate group. She received her JD from The George Washington University Law School and her undergraduate degree from Boston University. The Hunton & Williams real estate practice group advises clients on matters involving the full spectrum of commercial, industrial, retail, multifamily, hospitality and mixed-use properties.

Please visit http://www.hunton.com for more information.

Ms. Malech can be contacted at 202-419-2111 or rmalech@hunton.com

Coming up in December 2020...

Hotel Law: Protecting Guest Privacy

Every business is obligated to protect their customers from identity theft but unfortunately, data breaches have become all too common. In an effort to protect a guest's right to privacy and to safeguard their personal data, the European Union passed a General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that could hold hotels legally liable for any breaches that expose a customer's sensitive personal information. Though the GDPR only pertains to EU citizens' data, any international business that mishandles their data can be legally responsible. Another legal issue of concern is the fight involving hotel "resort fees." Several states attorney generals have recently filed suit against two major hotel chains in an effort to litigate this practice. Their suit alleges that these companies are "engaged in deceptive and misleading pricing practices and their failure to disclose fees is in violation of consumer protection laws." The suit seeks to force the hotel chains to advertise the true price of their hotel rooms. There are several other legal issues that the industry is being forced to address. Sexual harassment prevention in the workplace is still top of mind for hotel employers-particularly in New York and California, which now statutorily require harassment training. Hotels and motels in California will also soon be required to train all their employees on human trafficking awareness. Immigration issues are also of major concern to hotel employers, especially in the midst of a severe labor shortage. The government is issuing fewer H2B visas for low-skilled workers, as well as J-1 visas for temporary workers. Though there is little hope for any comprehensive immigration reform, hotel lobbying groups are actively seeking legal remedies to alleviate this problem. These are just a few of the critical issues that the December issue of the Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.