Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Mattler

Bob Mattler

Managing Director, Pace Equity

Bob Mattler joined PACE Equity in 2015 and is Managing Director of Michigan. PACE Equity is the leading national turnkey PACE project developer and funder in the country. PACE Equity is also the leader in utilizing PACE in hospitality projects. Bob's passion and practice involves assisting a wide variety of developers and building owners to access PACE financing. His current projects include a ground up construction senior living center, adaptive reuse of an old industrial building and a major infrastructure upgrade of a large hospital. As a new economic development tool in Michigan, Bob is helping to open PACE financing to a variety of asset classes, for profit and non-profit entities, bankers, lawyers, brokers and the Michigan commercial real estate industry in general. Combining real property legal skills, commercial real estate brokerage experience and almost ten years of involvement with the local chapter of the United States Green Building Council (USGBC) and its green LEED certification, Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) is the means to which Bob helps property owners and developers achieve their property business objectives. Among the highlights of his professional career of helping commercial property owners add value to their buildings includes almost twenty five years as an attorney, property tax consultant and leasing specialist with a boutique retail brokerage firm in the metropolitan Detroit area. Much of Bob's recent interaction with the commercial real estate community in Michigan has been to illustrate the business case for maintaining more efficient buildings which leads to a more valuable real estate investment. Information on this new economic development tool is now available in 30+ states and DC.

Please visit http://www.pace-equity.com for more information.

Mr. Mattler can be contacted at 248-762-4370 or bmattler@pace-equity.com

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.