Editorial Board   

Mr. Kiesner

Steve Kiesner

Director of National Accounts, Edison Electric Institute

Steve Kiesner is Director of the Edison Electric Institute's National Accounts Program. Based in Washington, D.C., EEI is the trade association of shareholder-owned energy companies. Its members produce approximately 79% of all of the electricity generated by electric utilities in the US. EEI's National Accounts provides multi-site companies with marketing information and intelligence. It also serves as a clearinghouse of information for the industry and provides forums for its members and multi-site national customers to engage one other-conduct business, discuss important issues, and share information. The National Accounts program also provides grass root lobbying initiatives with commercial customers. Steve has been with EEI's National Accounts since August, 1996. Before EEI, Steve was with the Potomac Electric Power Company (Pepco) for seven years where he served as customer representative for the federal government including the GSA, White House, Architect of the U.S. Capitol, National Parks Service, Smithsonian Institution, FBI, and several federal agencies others. He also was involved in implementing Pepco's Curtailable Load Program, an end-use management program for large commercial customers. Steve has a B.S. degrees in Economics and Business-Finance.

Mr. Kiesner can be contacted at 202-508-5000 or skiesner@eei.org

Coming up in July 2018...

Hotel Spa: Oasis Unplugged

The driving force in current hotel spa trends is the effort to manage unprecedented levels of stress experienced by their clients. Feeling increasingly overwhelmed by demanding careers and technology overload, people are craving places where they can go to momentarily escape the rigors of their daily lives. As a result, spas are positioning themselves as oases of unplugged human connection, where mindfulness and contemplation activities are becoming increasingly important. One leading hotel spa offers their clients the option to experience their treatments in total silence - no music, no talking, and no advice from the therapist - just pure unadulterated silence. Another leading hotel spa is working with a reputable medical clinic to develop a “digital detox” initiative, in which clients will be encouraged to unplug from their devices and engage in mindfulness activities to alleviate the stresses of excessive technology use. Similarly, other spas are counseling clients to resist allowing technology to monopolize their lives, and to engage in meditation and gratitude exercises in its place. The goal is to provide clients with a warm, inviting and tranquil sanctuary from the outside world, in addition to also providing genuine solutions for better sleep, proper nutrition, stress management and natural self-care. To accomplish this, some spas are incorporating a variety of new approaches - cryotherapy, Himalayan salt therapy and ayurveda treatments are becoming increasingly popular. Other spas are growing their own herbs and performing their treatments in lush outdoor gardens. Some spa therapists are being trained to assess a client's individual movement patterns to determine the most beneficial treatment specifically for them. The July issue of the Hotel Business Review will report on these trends and developments and examine how some hotel spas are integrating them into their operations.