Editorial Board   

Mr. Kiesner

Steve Kiesner

Director of National Accounts, Edison Electric Institute

Steve Kiesner is Director of the Edison Electric Institute's National Accounts Program. Based in Washington, D.C., EEI is the trade association of shareholder-owned energy companies. Its members produce approximately 79% of all of the electricity generated by electric utilities in the US. EEI's National Accounts provides multi-site companies with marketing information and intelligence. It also serves as a clearinghouse of information for the industry and provides forums for its members and multi-site national customers to engage one other-conduct business, discuss important issues, and share information. The National Accounts program also provides grass root lobbying initiatives with commercial customers. Steve has been with EEI's National Accounts since August, 1996. Before EEI, Steve was with the Potomac Electric Power Company (Pepco) for seven years where he served as customer representative for the federal government including the GSA, White House, Architect of the U.S. Capitol, National Parks Service, Smithsonian Institution, FBI, and several federal agencies others. He also was involved in implementing Pepco's Curtailable Load Program, an end-use management program for large commercial customers. Steve has a B.S. degrees in Economics and Business-Finance.

Mr. Kiesner can be contacted at 202-508-5000 or skiesner@eei.org

Coming up in December 2019...

Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

According to a recent study, the hospitality industry accounted for 2.9 trillion dollars in sales and in the U.S. alone, was responsible for 1 in 9 jobs. In an industry of that scope and dimension, legal issues touch every aspect of a hotel's operation, and legal services are required in order to conform to all prevailing laws and regulations. Though not all hotels face the same issues, there are some industry-wide subjects that are of concern more broadly. One of those matters is the issue of immigration and how it affects the ability of hotels to recruit qualified employees. The hotel industry is currently facing a labor crisis; the U.S. Labor Department estimates that there are 600,000 unfilled jobs in the industry. Part of the problem contributing to this labor shortage is the lack of H2B visas for low-skilled workers, combined with the difficulty in obtaining J-1 visas for temporary workers. Because comprehensive immigration reform is not being addressed politically, hotel managers expect things are going to get worse before they get better. Corporate cyber security is another major legal issue the industry must address. Hotels are under enormous pressure in this area given the large volume of customer financial transactions they handle daily. Recently, a federal court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission had the power to regulate corporate cyber security, so it is incumbent on hotels to establish data security programs in order to prevent data breaches. The lack of such programs could cause hotels to face legal threats from government agencies, class action lawsuits, and damage to their brand image if a data breach should occur. These are just two of the critical issues that the December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.