Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Stevens

Wendy Stevens

Chief Commercial Officer, First Hospitality Group

According to Chief Commercial Officer, Wendy Stevens, to be successful at First Hospitality Group one must make sure that they are adding value. “Focus on the priorities and don't get caught up in the minutia. Commit to what you say you're going to execute and get it done.” In her role, Ms. Stevens is responsible for developing and executing company strategy at a high level, pinpointing valuable business opportunities, and scouting out the best of the best for our workforce. Disciplined and determined in her approach, every challenge that comes across her desk is met with a sense of urgency that guarantees results.

Ms. Stevens' methods have proven successful time and again over her 17 years with First Hospitality Group, but the accomplishment with which she is most proud is the assemblage of her team of innovative leaders. “When I first started, we had 17 hotels in our portfolio and there were only three sales people, including myself, to work with them.” Since then, First Hospitality Group's portfolio has more than tripled; departments dedicated to marketing and revenue management have been developed to offer more holistic and dedicated support, and a total sales department of 3 grew to a team of more than 20. She attributes her success to the singular idea that, “There is nothing that you can't do; the only limits that we have, we set for ourselves.”

When she's not working with the brands to forge strong partnerships or sitting on civic committees as a representative of First Hospitality Group, you may find Ms. Stevens on the back of her Harley, flying down a zip-line, or scaling the side of a cliff. In her personal life just as in her professional life, she takes risks, moves quickly, and is fully committed to everything that she approaches. In both capacities, she pushes the limits of herself and those tenacious enough to keep up with her.

 


Please visit http://www.fhginc.com for more information.

Ms. Stevens can be contacted at 224-257-4000 or wstevens@fhginc.com

Coming up in December 2020...

Hotel Law: Protecting Guest Privacy

Every business is obligated to protect their customers from identity theft but unfortunately, data breaches have become all too common. In an effort to protect a guest's right to privacy and to safeguard their personal data, the European Union passed a General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that could hold hotels legally liable for any breaches that expose a customer's sensitive personal information. Though the GDPR only pertains to EU citizens' data, any international business that mishandles their data can be legally responsible. Another legal issue of concern is the fight involving hotel "resort fees." Several states attorney generals have recently filed suit against two major hotel chains in an effort to litigate this practice. Their suit alleges that these companies are "engaged in deceptive and misleading pricing practices and their failure to disclose fees is in violation of consumer protection laws." The suit seeks to force the hotel chains to advertise the true price of their hotel rooms. There are several other legal issues that the industry is being forced to address. Sexual harassment prevention in the workplace is still top of mind for hotel employers-particularly in New York and California, which now statutorily require harassment training. Hotels and motels in California will also soon be required to train all their employees on human trafficking awareness. Immigration issues are also of major concern to hotel employers, especially in the midst of a severe labor shortage. The government is issuing fewer H2B visas for low-skilled workers, as well as J-1 visas for temporary workers. Though there is little hope for any comprehensive immigration reform, hotel lobbying groups are actively seeking legal remedies to alleviate this problem. These are just a few of the critical issues that the December issue of the Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.