Editorial Board   

Ms. Samsel

Christine Samsel

Attorney, Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck

Christine Samsel is a highly respected labor and employment attorney with Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck.

Ms. Samsel advises employers on virtually every aspect of employment law, from advice and counseling, training and contract negotiation to litigation. She conducts due diligence for companies and investors with respect to labor and employment issues in corporate transactions and financial restructuring.

Ms. Samsel regularly negotiates and drafts high-level executive employment agreements and ancillary documents.? She assists companies in establishing employment policies, conducting employee / management training, negotiating severance agreements, conducting internal investigations and audits, and implementing reductions in force.

Throughout her extensive career, Ms. Samsel has handled a wide variety of federal, state and local administrative proceedings before agencies such as the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the U.S. Department of Labor, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, the U.S. Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs and comparable state and local agencies, representing clients in affirmative action, wage-and-hour, immigration compliance and employment policy audits.

With 11 offices across the western US, plus Washington, DC and Atlantic City, Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck is where business, law and politics converge. Founded in 1968, Brownstein provides an integrated approach that combines sensible business solutions with 20 years of Capitol Hill perspective. The firm's 250 lawyers and policy professionals have built a reputation for providing multidisciplinary legal counsel that drives results and connects business leaders to the information they need to make decisions.

Please visit http://www.bhfs.com for more information.

Ms. Samsel can be contacted at +1 303-223-1133 or csamsel@bhfs.com

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.