Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Phillips

Luna Phillips

Shareholder, Gunster LLP

Luna Phillips is a Florida Bar board certified Gunster shareholder who practices in the area of environmental, administrative and governmental law. She leads the firm's Environmental practice.

Prior to joining the firm, Ms. Phillips was a senior attorney for the South Florida Water Management District and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection.

Ms. Phillips practices exclusively in the area of water and natural resources law before state and federal agencies. Her practice includes assisting large scale developers, agricultural entities, public and private companies, as well as individuals in a wide range of water related issues. Her experience ranges from water quality regulations such as TMDLs, to environmental resource permitting, to water use permitting, to sovereign state land and listed species approvals.

In addition, Ms. Phillips actively works on Everglades related restoration issues in south Florida involving complex restoration agreements with governmental entities and water quality and supply regulations. She provides more than two decades of experience in administrative law and litigation before the Division of Administrative Hearings (DOAH), as well as in rulemaking, public records and Sunshine law.


Ms. Phillips can be contacted at 954-712-1478 or lphillips@gunster.com

Coming up in April 2019...

Guest Service: A Culture of YES

In a recent global consumers report, 97% of the participants said that customer service is a major factor in their loyalty to a brand, and 76% said they view customer service as the true test of how much a company values them. And since there is no industry more reliant on customer satisfaction than the hotel industry, managers must be unrelenting in their determination to hire, train and empower the very best people, and to create a culture of exceptional customer service within their organization. Of course, this begins with hiring the right people. There are people who are naturally service-oriented; people who are warm, empathetic, enthusiastic, pleasant, thoughtful and optimistic; people who take pride in their ability to solve problems for the hotel guests they are serving. Then, those same employees must be empowered to solve problems using their own judgment, without having to track down a manager to do it. This is how seamless problem solving and conflict resolution are achieved in guest service. This willingness to empower employees is part of creating a Culture of Yes within an organization.  The goal is to create an environment in which everyone is striving to say “Yes”, rather than figuring out ways to say, “No”. It is essential that this attitude be instilled in all frontline, customer-facing, employees. Finally, in order to ensure that the hotel can generate a consistent level of performance across a wide variety of situations, management must also put in place well-defined systems and standards, and then educate their employees about them. Every employee must be aware of and responsible for every standard that applies in their department. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.