Editorial Board   

Mr. Boles

Jesse Boles

Executive Director of Operations, FreemanGroup

Jesse Boles joined FreemanGroup in 2007, and assumed the role of Executive Director of Operations in November 2008. He is currently responsible for FreemanGroup's training and measurement divisions, heading projects in conjunction with some of the hospitality industry's leading service providers. Mr. Boles has worked with leadership teams to develop brand service cultures at both existing and new properties for Las Vegas casinos and luxury hotels. He has been integral in the set up and execution of brand-specific measurement programs for Wyndham Hotel Group, Hard Rock International, Delaware North Companies, and MGM Resorts International. Mr. Boles has a passion for opening new properties, and has had the privilege of consulting during the openings of Hard Rock Hotel San Diego, MGM Grand Detroit, Aria Resort & Casino, CityCenter, and the historic Mauna Kea Beach Hotel on the Big Island of Hawaii, among others. He has also helped develop and lead customer service training initiatives for existing client properties for Destination Hotels and Resorts, Windsor Court Hotel New Orleans, and The Mirage Resort & Casino. In 2010, Mr. Boles initiated two of the largest and most complex training and measurement projects undertaken by FreemanGroup. In May 2010, FreemanGroup kicked off a nationwide service training initiative for Trinidad and Tobago, a country of 1.4 million people. The ongoing project targets providers in all areas of the tourism industry, including those in the immigrations, customs, taxi, hotel, restaurant, retail, and other sectors. In June 2010, work began on the development and implementation of an airport-wide service initiative at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, the world's busiest air traffic center. Mr. Boles's profound interest in the ways organizations and groups function has led him to explore a wide array of fields, including behavioral economics, cognitive science, leadership, and motivation. Raised in Wisconsin, he is a product of the University of Wisconsin at Madison and steadfast fan of all things Bucky Badger.

Mr. Boles can be contacted at 972-479-1345 or jboles@freemangroup.org

Coming up in November 2019...

Architecture & Design: Biophilic Design

The hospitality industry is constantly evolving to meet and exceed guest expectations. As a result, hotels are always on the lookout for new ways to improve the guest experience, and architecture and design is an essential part of this equation. Bold design is often the most effective way to make an exceptional first impression - an impression guests use to distinguish between brands. One design trend that is being embraced worldwide has become known as “Biophilic Design.” Biophilic design is based on the concept of biophilia, which is the theory that human beings have an innate tendency to seek out nature, natural elements, and natural forms. Biophilic design is more than hotels simply adding a surplus of plants; it involves incorporating specific design elements into a hotel in order to imbue it with a sense of wellness and well-being. Some of those elements include exposure to natural lighting; views of nature and rooms with a view; natural architectural patterns; salvaged or reclaimed woods of all types; reclaimed metals; sustainably sourced stone; living green walls and vertical gardens; and direct and indirect exposure to nature. Hotels that have incorporated biophilic design into their properties are reaping the benefits associated with this trend including reduced stress responses, better air quality, lower energy costs, and more positive guest reviews. Biophilic design has also been shown to improve guest moods and to satisfy consumer demand for environmental responsibility. Savvy hotel owners and managers are aware that nature-inspired elements enhance their guests' comfort and well-being, which is why this trend is becoming so prevalent. Biophilic design is just one topic in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.