Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Korman

Robin Korman

Senior Vice President Loyalty Marketing, Wyndham Hotel Group

Robin Korman was appointed senior vice president, loyalty marketing, in September 2009, overseeing Wyndham Rewards®, the guest loyalty program of Wyndham Hotel Group with more than 6,500 participating hotels in 36 countries. Among her many responsibilities, she handles the development and management of the company’s loyalty program, which happens to be the largest in the hotel industry based on number of participating hotels; as well customer loyalty initiatives, all direct-marketing programs and internal and external strategic marketing alliances. Previously, she was senior vice president and general manager at Chase Card Services where she was responsible for overseeing the company’s multi-billion dollar partner credit card portfolio, including development and repositioning of new and existing products and the creation of new acquisition and growth strategies. Prior to Chase, Ms. Korman spent seven years with Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, serving first as vice president, global loyalty marketing leader, and later as vice president, brand marketing leader for Aloft Hotels and Element Hotels. In those roles, she was responsible for overseeing Starwood’s Preferred Guest program and later, for developing the positioning and marketing for the global launches of the company’s Aloft® and ElementSM brands. In addition to her most recent experience, Ms. Korman has also served in executive marketing, communications and public relations roles with General Electric and Citibank.

Ms. Korman can be contacted at 973-753-6590 or robin.korman@wyn.com

Coming up in May 2018...

Eco-Friendly Practices: The Greening of Your Bottom Line

There are strong moral and ethical reasons why a hotel should incorporate eco-friendly practices into their business but it is also becoming abundantly clear that “going green” can dramatically improve a hotel's bottom line. When energy-saving measures are introduced - fluorescent bulbs, ceiling fans, linen cards, lights out cards, motion sensors for all public spaces, and energy management systems - energy bills are substantially reduced. When water-saving equipment is introduced - low-flow showerheads, low-flow toilets, waterless urinals, and serving water only on request in restaurants - water bills are also considerably reduced. Waste hauling is another major expense which can be lowered through recycling efforts and by avoiding wastefully-packaged products. Vendors can be asked to deliver products in minimal wrapping, and to deliver products one day, and pick up the packaging materials the next day - generating substantial savings. In addition, renewable sources of energy (solar, geothermal, wind, etc.) have substantially improved the economics of using alternative energies at the property level. There are other compelling reasons to initiate sustainability practices in their operation. Being green means guests and staff are healthier, which can lead to an increase in staff retention, as well as increased business from health conscious guests. Also, sooner or later, all properties will be sold, and green hotels will command a higher price due to its energy efficiencies. Finally, some hotels qualify for tax credits, subsidies and rebates from local, regional and federal governments for the eco-friendly investments they've made in their hotels. The May issue of the Hotel Business Review will document how some hotels are integrating sustainable practices into their operations and how their hotels are benefiting from them.