Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Glasser

Marc Glasser

Managing Director, RM LLC

Marc Glasser is the Managing Director of RM (Protection Risk Management) LLC. RM LLC provides security, business continuity, and emergency management services spanning the protection of life, operations, assets and stakeholder value. He directs risk management, security, and business continuity programs (including business impact and supply chain analysis) to mitigate vulnerabilities, including natural (e.g., floods, earthquakes, hurricanes), technical (e.g., utility service disruptions, hazardous materials incidents), and intentional (e.g., terrorism, theft, espionage). Mr. Glasser also directs security, crisis and emergency management training, exercises, and evaluations. His risk management program evaluations are comprehensive and assess organization-wide, single point of failure, and site-specific variables in terms of financial (e.g., cost-benefit, profit and loss implication), stakeholder, and operational feasibility. Mr. Glasser is a former US Department of State Special Agent and a graduate of the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center. He holds a U.S. Government Top Secret security clearance and has worked in over 90 countries. Mr. Glasser has presented at national and international conferences. He participates on multiple professional associations and academic boards. His publications include industry and academic peer-reviewed journal articles. He holds a Master of Science Degree in Crisis and Emergency Management from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas and a Bachelor of Science Degree in Law Enforcement and Police Science from Sam Houston State University. He is an Adjunct Professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, University of Maryland University College, and Henley-Putnam University. Mr. Glasser's professional accreditations include: CORE (Certified Organizational Resilience Executive, The International Consortium for Organizational Resilience); CPP (Certified Protection Professional, ASIS International); CEM (Certified Emergency Manager, International Association of Emergency Managers); CMAS (Certified Master Anti-Terrorism Specialist, Anti-Terrorist Accreditation Board); and ABCHS Fellow (American Board for Certification in Homeland Security Fellow). Additionally, he is Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP) and HSEEP Train-the-Trainer Certified by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and FEMA Continuity of Operations (COOP) Planner's Train-the-Trainer Workshop Certified.

Mr. Glasser can be contacted at 702-809-3434 or mglasser@rmllc.com

Coming up in December 2019...

Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

According to a recent study, the hospitality industry accounted for 2.9 trillion dollars in sales and in the U.S. alone, was responsible for 1 in 9 jobs. In an industry of that scope and dimension, legal issues touch every aspect of a hotel's operation, and legal services are required in order to conform to all prevailing laws and regulations. Though not all hotels face the same issues, there are some industry-wide subjects that are of concern more broadly. One of those matters is the issue of immigration and how it affects the ability of hotels to recruit qualified employees. The hotel industry is currently facing a labor crisis; the U.S. Labor Department estimates that there are 600,000 unfilled jobs in the industry. Part of the problem contributing to this labor shortage is the lack of H2B visas for low-skilled workers, combined with the difficulty in obtaining J-1 visas for temporary workers. Because comprehensive immigration reform is not being addressed politically, hotel managers expect things are going to get worse before they get better. Corporate cyber security is another major legal issue the industry must address. Hotels are under enormous pressure in this area given the large volume of customer financial transactions they handle daily. Recently, a federal court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission had the power to regulate corporate cyber security, so it is incumbent on hotels to establish data security programs in order to prevent data breaches. The lack of such programs could cause hotels to face legal threats from government agencies, class action lawsuits, and damage to their brand image if a data breach should occur. These are just two of the critical issues that the December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.