Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Mullen

Sean Mullen

Chief Sales & Marketing Officer , Noble House Hotels & Resorts

Sean Mullen, chief sales and marketing officer at Noble House Hotels & Resorts, offers a results-driven approach to marketing through 20 years of hospitality industry experience, ranging from sales and catering to marketing and management. His success in branding, positioning, consumer marketing, revenue growth and advertising effectiveness contribute to the growth and development of business and support corporate strategic initiatives. Appointed to the newly-created title of chief sales and marketing officer at Noble House in September 2011, Mr. Mullen oversees a nationwide sales team of more than 45 employees, working to provide targeted, strategic sales support and direction in all market segments. He also oversees strategic direction and implementation in sales, marketing, catering, conference services, reservations sales and national sales. Previously, Mr. Mullen acted as the Noble House Hotels & Resorts corporate director of sales and marketing from 2003 - 2007. Mr. Mullen began his career with Noble House in 2002 at LaPlaya Beach & Golf Resort in Naples, Fla., as the director of sales and marketing. In this role he developed strong marketing campaigns, repositioned the brand and completed a $54 million transformation. As a seasoned hotel industry executive, with experience in commercial luxury properties and international real estate, Mr. Mullen has incredible expertise in management takeovers, ownership changes, repositioning under performing assets, and expansion and development for high-profile companies such as Ritz-Carlton Hotels, Mandarin Oriental Hotel Group, Jack Nicklaus Golf Companies, Fairmont Hotels, Auberge Hotels and Capella Hotels. In addition, he is knowledgable in the opening of real estate developments, from hotels and resorts to clubs and golf courses. Mr. Mullen attended Lafayette College in Eason, Penn., and graduated with a bachelor of arts degree in economics/business with a minor in anthropology and sociology. He grew up in New Jersey and currently resides in Seattle, Wash., with his wife and four daughters. Mullen has won multiple industry and corporate awards including: • The Departures Magazine Luxury Marketing Achievement Award 2005 • HSMAI Adrian Awards - Gold, Silver and Bronze 2005 • Nominated as International Hotel and Restaurant Association and HOTELS “Young Hotelier & Restaurateur of the World Award” 1999

Mr. Mullen can be contacted at 425-827-8737 or smullen@noblehousehotels.com

Coming up in January 2019...

Mobile Technology: The Future is Now

Mobile Technology continues to advance at a relentless pace and the hotel industry continues to adapt. Hotel guests have shown a strong preference for mobile self-service - from checking-in/out at a hotel kiosk, to ordering room service, making dinner reservations, booking spa treatments, and managing laundry/dry cleaning services. And they also enjoy the convenience of paying for these services with smart phone mobile payments. In addition, some hotels have adopted a “concierge in your pocket” concept. Through a proprietary hotel app, guests can access useful information such as local entertainment venues, tourist attractions, event calendars, and medical facilities and services. In-room entertainment continues to be a key factor, as guests insist on the capacity to plug in their own mobile devices to customize their entertainment choices. Mobile technology also allows for greater marketing opportunities. For example, many hotels have adopted the use of “push notifications” - sending promotions, discounts and special event messages to guests based on their property location, purchase history, profiles, etc. Near field communication (NFC) technology is also being utilized to support applications such as opening room doors, earning loyalty points, renting a bike, accessing a rental car, and more. Finally, some hotels have adopted more futuristic technology. Robots are in use that have the ability to move between floors to deliver room service requests for all kinds of items - food, beverages, towels, toothbrushes, chargers and snacks. And infrared scanners are being used by housekeeping staff that can detect body heat within a room, alerting staff that the room is occupied and they should come back at a later time. The January Hotel Business Review will report on what some hotels are doing to maximize their opportunities in this exciting mobile technology space.