Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Taylor

Faith Taylor

Senior Vice President Global Corporate Social Responsibility Officer, Wyndham Worldwide

Faith Taylor currently oversees Wyndham Worldwide Corporate Social Responsibility program's policies and strategies which include sustainability, philanthropy, wellness, diversity, human rights, ethics and responsible sourcing. The program is implemented across 40 hospitality brands, over 36,000 employees and over 100,000 locations in 100 countries. She has overseen the development of the company's corporate policies, strategies, reporting and branding initiatives since she started the Wyndham Green program in 2006. Ms. Taylor is Chair of the Sustainability Working Committee of the World Travel & Tourism Council and Chairwoman of the Board of Directors of the USGBC of New Jersey. She is also a member of the International Tourism Partnership organizations where she has participated in setting industry standards like the Hotel Carbon Metric Initiative and policies. Wyndham is a recognized corporate leader working with the Clinton Global Initiative and the Obama Better Building Challenge in setting leading programs for the built environment. In 2014 the National Diversity Council named her “One of the Most Powerful Women in the Industry”. Under her leadership in 2014 Wyndham was ranked as one of the top 50 Greenest Companies in America by Newsweek and in 2014 was recognized by the Dow Jones Sustainability Index as both World and North American leader in the Hotel, Resort and Cruise line sector and in 2014. CDP has recognized Wyndham as a leader in both performance and disclosure. In 2013, Wyndham Worldwide reduced its carbon emissions by 13% and water is down 16% globally and 25% of its $2.1 Billion supply chain has met the Wyndham Green criteria. Ms. Taylor has experience in P&L management, new business and product development as well as marketing and strategic planning. Ms. Taylor worked at Wyndham Hotel and Resorts where she was responsible for repositioning the brand through innovation and new product development programs. She also oversaw the repositioning, and marketing for the Ramada International brand. Ms. Taylor has worked at Avon Inc., Apple Computer and International Home Foods. She has an MBA from Wharton business school and a BA from Stanford University. She is married with two children. She was born in Japan and is of Asian and African American heritage.

Ms. Taylor can be contacted at 973-753-8613 or faith.taylor@wyn.com

Coming up in May 2020...

Eco-Friendly Practices: Creative Innovation

Being eco-friendly is no longer a fad. It is an urgent planetary need and hotels are actively doing their part to reduce their carbon footprint by implementing sustainable, green practices. In addition to the goodwill derived from doing the right thing, hotels are also realizing the benefits to their business. A large percentage of Millennials expect hotels to be eco-friendly and will only patronize those properties that are proudly conforming. Consequently, more hotels are realizing that sustainability is a key element in a successful branding strategy. In addition, going green can lead to a more profitable bottom line, as savings on electricity, water and cleaning materials can add up. Also, there are other advantages that come with being an eco-friendly business, such as government subsidies and tax and loan incentives. As a result, many hotels are finding innovative ways to integrate eco-friendly practices into their business. Geo-thermal energy systems, along with energy-from-waste systems, are being used to heat and cool the property. Passive solar panels, green roofs, natural lighting and natural ventilation strategies also assist in energy conservation. Low-flow water systems and plumbing fixtures make a contribution, as does eco-friendly hardwood flooring, and energy efficient televisions and appliances throughout the property. In addition, some hotels have implemented in-room recycling programs, and only provide all-natural, personal care items. One hotel has actually constructed a bee-keeping operation on their grounds. Not only is this good for the bees but the hotel also produces products from the operation which they sell. This kind of creative innovation also holds enormous appeal to guests. The May issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some hotels are doing to integrate sustainable practices into their operations and how they are benefiting from them.