Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Brunetti

Vince Brunetti

Exec. Assistant Manager / F&B Director, Hyatt Regency Waikiki Beach Resort & Spa

Originally from Michigan, the northern suburbs of Detroit, Vince Brunetti's career in the hospitality industry began with the family business. With three family-owned and operated restaurants in the Detroit area, Mr. Brunetti's innate talent and occupational destiny were both preordained. Mr. Brunetti attended the Institute of Hotel & Motel Association, a Michigan State hotel program, and furthered his studies at Rutgers University in New Jersey. Shortly after moving to New Jersey, Mr. Brunetti was tapped by the Trump organization for the Trump Marina Hotel & Casino in Atlantic City, where he held various food and beverage positions during his six year tenure. In 1991, he joined Merv Griffin Resorts Hotel & Casino, where he managed the VIP players clubs as well as two restaurants. In 1995, Mr. Brunetti marked the beginning of his career with Hyatt, accepting a position as Beverage Manager at the Hyatt Regency Bethesda. He transferred to the Hyatt Regency Princeton as Banquet Manager in 1997, and he was promoted to Director of Outlets at the Hyatt Regency Newport Beach in 1999. With measurable successes under his belt, Mr. Brunetti was again promoted in 2002 to Assistant Food & Beverage Director at the Hyatt Regency Orlando Airport. Opportunities took him back to Southern California, where, in 2004, he was promoted to Assistant Food & Beverage Director at the Hyatt Regency Irvine. In 2005, Mr. Brunetti further advanced, becoming Food & Beverage Director at the Hyatt Regency Long Beach. In 2008, Mr. Brunetti gladly accepted the position of Executive Assistant Manager - Food & Beverage Director at the Hyatt Regency Waikiki Beach Resort and Spa. At the 1,229 room resort, Mr. Brunetti oversees all food and beverage operations, including five restaurants and lounges, and a team of 240 employees. From the elegance of a Hawaiian-inspired steakhouse concept at The Colony to the inspired Italian-Asian fusion at Ciao Mein, Mr. Brunetti takes pride in offering an eclectic array of flavorful cuisines paired with authentic hospitality and service. Encouraging innovation and creativity in his team has resulted in inventive new items such as Torched Sushi and house-infused vodkas featuring tropical ingredients. Dedicated to offering an excellent value to guests of the Waikiki resort, Mr. Brunetti has been instrumental in introducing economically-sensitive prix-fixe menus, “Sunset Hour” specials, and customizable and affordable in-room dining offerings. In 2011, Mr. Brunetti oversaw the transformation of Hyatt Regency Waikiki Beach's entire food and beverage program with the introduction of two new restaurants, Shor American Seafood Grill, and Japengo, A Pacific Rim Restaurant and Sushi Bar, as well as a new poolside lounge and bar, Swim, and new Regency Club product.

Mr. Brunetti can be contacted at 808-237-6104 or vincent.brunetti@hyatt.com

Coming up in December 2020...

Hotel Law: Protecting Guest Privacy

Every business is obligated to protect their customers from identity theft but unfortunately, data breaches have become all too common. In an effort to protect a guest's right to privacy and to safeguard their personal data, the European Union passed a General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that could hold hotels legally liable for any breaches that expose a customer's sensitive personal information. Though the GDPR only pertains to EU citizens' data, any international business that mishandles their data can be legally responsible. Another legal issue of concern is the fight involving hotel "resort fees." Several states attorney generals have recently filed suit against two major hotel chains in an effort to litigate this practice. Their suit alleges that these companies are "engaged in deceptive and misleading pricing practices and their failure to disclose fees is in violation of consumer protection laws." The suit seeks to force the hotel chains to advertise the true price of their hotel rooms. There are several other legal issues that the industry is being forced to address. Sexual harassment prevention in the workplace is still top of mind for hotel employers-particularly in New York and California, which now statutorily require harassment training. Hotels and motels in California will also soon be required to train all their employees on human trafficking awareness. Immigration issues are also of major concern to hotel employers, especially in the midst of a severe labor shortage. The government is issuing fewer H2B visas for low-skilled workers, as well as J-1 visas for temporary workers. Though there is little hope for any comprehensive immigration reform, hotel lobbying groups are actively seeking legal remedies to alleviate this problem. These are just a few of the critical issues that the December issue of the Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.