Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Pepe

Dianne Pepe

Director of Group Sales, Millennium Broadway Hotel, New York

As director of group sales for the 750-room Millennium Broadway Hotel New York, Dianne Pepe has responsibility for the property's 110,000 square feet of meeting and business space, including the only residential IACC-accredited conference center in New York City and the iconic and historic Hudson Theatre, an immensely popular choice for special corporate events, product launches, private social events, and weddings, including the largest number of same sex marriages in the city. Prior to joining Millennium Ms. Pepe was area director of sales for the Pyramid Hotel Group where she directed the sales operation and managed a staff of 16 for two “big box” central New Jersey IACC certified conference center hotels totaling 770 rooms and over 110,000 square feet of meeting space. Before that, she was director of group sales for The Westin Princeton at Forrestal Village, a 294-room hotel with 22,000 square feet of conference space. Ms. Pepe began her sales career as catering manager at the all-suite Madison Suites Hotel before moving on to the 204-room Radisson Hotel Princeton. In 2004 she was recruited by the prestigious Doral Forrestal Conference Center and Spa where she received recognition as the top hotel sales manager for Interstate Hotels and Resorts Northeast 2005 and began her love affair with IACC. She holds an A.A.S. degree from Sullivan County Community College, part of the State University of New York system.

Ms. Pepe can be contacted at 212-789-7566 or dpepe@mill-usa.com

Coming up in December 2020...

Hotel Law: Protecting Guest Privacy

Every business is obligated to protect their customers from identity theft but unfortunately, data breaches have become all too common. In an effort to protect a guest's right to privacy and to safeguard their personal data, the European Union passed a General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that could hold hotels legally liable for any breaches that expose a customer's sensitive personal information. Though the GDPR only pertains to EU citizens' data, any international business that mishandles their data can be legally responsible. Another legal issue of concern is the fight involving hotel "resort fees." Several states attorney generals have recently filed suit against two major hotel chains in an effort to litigate this practice. Their suit alleges that these companies are "engaged in deceptive and misleading pricing practices and their failure to disclose fees is in violation of consumer protection laws." The suit seeks to force the hotel chains to advertise the true price of their hotel rooms. There are several other legal issues that the industry is being forced to address. Sexual harassment prevention in the workplace is still top of mind for hotel employers-particularly in New York and California, which now statutorily require harassment training. Hotels and motels in California will also soon be required to train all their employees on human trafficking awareness. Immigration issues are also of major concern to hotel employers, especially in the midst of a severe labor shortage. The government is issuing fewer H2B visas for low-skilled workers, as well as J-1 visas for temporary workers. Though there is little hope for any comprehensive immigration reform, hotel lobbying groups are actively seeking legal remedies to alleviate this problem. These are just a few of the critical issues that the December issue of the Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.